PetMeds®: Blood in Dog’s Urine

Blood in urine can have many possible causes

The presenting symptom of a pet urinating blood can have many potential causes. The most important question I ask pet owners with a dog having blood in its urine is to find out whether it is associated with urgency, straining, increased frequency, or difficulty urinating. In those cases, one of the more common causes is overgrowth of various bacteria in the urinary tract, which is usually best treated by a veterinary exam, urine analysis and possibly prescription antibiotics by your vet for pet medicines like Amoxicillin, Clavamox, Cephalexin or Baytril.

Most of the first time simple urinary tract infections usually respond within several days; however, if the symptoms are relapsing or don’t resolve, then a sterile urine culture is performed to look for resistant bacteria, thus allowing a better antibiotic selection, and/or x-rays performed to look for other abnormalities (like urinary tract calculi or stones).

If no known causes are apparent then a more complete workup including CBC/chemistry blood work, as well as ultrasound of the abdomen can be done to look for other abnormalities such as hormonal disorders like Cushing’s disease, diabetes, as well as urinary tract anatomic abnormalities, in addition to even polyps or tumors, particularly in older pets.

Many overweight dogs can sometimes have recurrent urinary tract infections because of anatomic problems associated with a deep seated or sunken vulva, as well as extra skin folds in the vaginal area, which may need surgical correction to prevent urinary tract infection relapse. Even after a thorough diagnostic workup, there are cases in which veterinarians are unable to figure out why a pet has recurrent urinary tract infections. In those cases, some vets will prescribe pulse antibiotic therapy the first several days of each month, or low dose PM continuous chronic antibiotic therapy given at bedtime.

There are also holistic options that can be explored like homeopathy or traditional Chinese medicine or acupuncture. For pets with simple signs of acute urinary tract infections or inflammations, I will advise pet owners to use immune boosting supplements like Cranberry Relief, which can boost the immune system of the urinary tract, along with vitamin C at various dosages.

In cases in which there is chronic bloody urine or bloody discharge from the urethra without signs of urinary tract straining, urgency or frequency, then those pets should have a complete evaluation. This should include not only urine analysis/culture, but also full blood panels to screen for diseases that could be involved with bleeding or clotting disorders such as autoimmune diseases of the platelets, genetic clotting abnormalities, tick borne diseases, etc.

With a systematic approach to dogs with bloody urine, most cases can be adequately diagnosed and controlled with time and patience.

Related Posts

506 Comments

  1. This was my letter to my vet:
    I am still concerned about Buster, this started several months ago with a UTI and simple blood in urine. He received a antibiotic and things from there have just seemed to go down hill, he was given 1 or 2 more rounds after that, he was now scooting and seemed to have pain when pooping. I ask about prostate, but seemed to not be an issue, since he was fixed at a young age? But was told his anal sacs were full and somewhat impacted. Since then it’s not gotten any better, we have made several visits back since then, in which his sacs where expressed, now there is a new problem, he is having incontinence, but there is no longer blood in the urine, but he is still having pain when pooping. Now we are told he is in renal failure, he won’t eat renal food, so he feels worse. I try to get him to eat anything, can, mixtures anything . He seems to be better except the leakage and painful popping. Once again he comes back and is given something for leakage, but when he starts taking that his leakage is a little better, but looks tinged with brown and red, actually a lot of red and even though he seems ok most of the time, and even though the just expressed his glands, he cries out while pooping, I am just afraid we are missing something, I can’t find anything in reading about the pain during pooping in stage 2 renal failure? Could it be something else causing his issues, or is there anything I can give him, he seems fine otherwise, most of the time.

    What do you think? I am at my wits end

    • Sorry to hear about your dog’s continued discomfort and varied symptoms. I would make sure that AT LEAST x rays and/or urine cultures have been done to assess bladder, kidneys, for infection etc. I would also have your vet do a rectal. Even though your pet has been neutered, we DO SEE MUCH HIGHER incidence of prostate cancer in NEUTERED male dogs than nonneutered dogs. I would also suggest ultrasound of abdomen as well to assess kidneys, bladder, etc These should help with pinpointing a specific diagnosis, treatment plan, and prognosis

  2. I have taken my female dog to the vets on Saturday, cause she had blood in her urine , and was drinking alit of water and , was weeing a lot, was eating a little bit , not much, been on antibodics, and it started to clear straight away , went back to vets Monday got more antibiotics for her , I have seen tiny weeny spots of wee with light tiny bit of blood , is that just the infection clearing up , could you please let me know , can’t see no blood in her wee outside its just urine only

    • Hi Elaine. If the bloody spots in the urine persists or gets worse, then best to see your local vet again for a recheck to make sure correct antibiotic is being used i.e by maybe asking for a sterile urine culture, or perhaps asking vet for x rays to rule out urinary tract bladder stones.

Leave a Comment