PetMeds®: Excessive Drooling (Ptyalism) in Cats and Dogs

 
Filed under Dr. Dym's Vet Blog
One of the more urgent common phone calls to veterinary offices and emergency clinics across the country is when a dog or cat suddenly starts drooling excessively without warning.  Sometimes the saliva can be so thick and profuse, that both dogs and cats experience difficulty/heavy breathing. There can be many possible causes of a cat or dog heavy salivating. The first one to always consider is whether the pet potentially was recently exposed to a toxin or pesticide in the environment outside or inside the home. Even certain topical pesticides, including topical Frontline Plus and Advantage, can cause drooling in sensitive pets, especially if the product is inappropriately applied, or in an area where the pet can lick it off. One possible cause of excessive salivating or drooling may be caused by your pet's allegries

Electric cord injuries and burns, especially seen in puppies and kittens, can cause difficulty breathing as well as excessive drooling, and such pets should get immediate emergency care. Allergic reactions to common household cleaning agents, and pesticides on the lawn or inside the home are also common causes of drooling. Even certain prescription and bitter tasting medications, such as the commonly prescribed drug Metronidazole can cause heavy drooling particularly in cats.

Many dogs and especially cats will drool to varying degrees, often accompanying nausea and vomiting seen in so many acute and chronic conditions and diseases. When drooling is more chronic, especially if the drool has a foul odor, one of the first category of diseases to consider is periodontal disease in both dogs and especially cats. Our feline friends sometimes can develop severe painful gum inflammation known as feline gingivitis/stomatitis syndrome, which can often make it difficult for them to eat.

All such pets should have an immediate veterinary exam with thorough evaluation of the oral cavity for any dental/gum disease, ulceration of the tongue, as well as a check for any foreign bodies, gum growths or tumors in the mouth or throat. Upper respiratory infections such as feline calicivirus can not only cause sneezing and nasal congestion, but also oral ulcers that can lead to heavy drooling. If the drooling persists and no known causes can be found, a full baseline workup at the veterinarian, including blood work, urine analysis, and x-rays are needed.

Read Related Posts on PetMeds Blog:

  1. My Pet Drools Excessively
  2. Feline Herpes Virus
  3. PetMeds®: Chronic Coughing or Gagging in Dogs and Cats
  4. PetMeds® FeLV/FIV Infection in Cats
  5. Chronic Coughing in Pets

12 Comments

  1. Lorraine
    Posted July 7, 2012 at 4:10 am | Permalink

    My cat started off sneezing last night and now is starting to drool and his eyes are a little watery. I call to see if my vet was on call and found out the vet on call is in Pittsburgh.what can I do for him? He’s around 9 years old and never had any problems before.

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    You can try chlorphenirimine at dose of 2 mg twice daily, as well as DMG liquid from 1800petmeds. If signs worsen or persist, see vet for evaluation.

    [Reply]

    Lorraine Reply:

    Thank You so much for answering.When we got up this morning rushed him to the vet.I thought he was only 9 but hubby said he’s 12yr. old.Anyway they took him temp.and it was 104 and an x-ray and said he has asthma and pneumonia.Game him a steroid shot and an antibiotic and said we should see results in 2 hours. After the 1st hour he was looking pretty good then about an hour later he was drooling again and keep opening and closing his mouth to breathe. I called the vet again and this time a different one answered and said she saw his x-ray and didn’t think he looked good that there was fluid on the inside and outside of his lungs.She said if he didn’t get any better to take him to Pittsburgh to be put in an oxygen tent, but the other Dr. said not to stress him out but it would (it’s a 2 hr drive)He’s a little better,as a matter of fact he just came down for a drink while I’m typing.I got a small oxygen tank from my mom but can’t get him to want to use it. So trying to think of a way that he will let me,cause it has a canal( I know spelled wrong) on it so he needs to be able to breathe in to use it. I also have 5 other cats and several of them are sneezing off and on.Thank You

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Good luck. Sounds like vets disagree on this one. Perhaps some lasix could help reduce fluid in chest even with steroid/antibiotic shot. In cat this age, fluid in chest can indicate heart issues and/or sometimes cancer. Sometimes analysis of the fluid by needle aspirate can help with diagnosis.

  2. Rita Chan
    Posted October 4, 2012 at 8:55 am | Permalink

    My dog is suffering from cancer and the vet can’t do anything except to give him carprofen for the pain. I also been giving him liver protector and Anti-oxidant tablets as health supplement. He was diagnosed of cancer in Jan this year. Everything was fine until 3days ago he started to salvation excessively. I do not know what to do. I just want him to live comfortably for the rest of his remaining days. Please help!

    Thank you
    Rita

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Sorry to hear of your dog Rita. i would consider consulting with a holistic vet in your area http://www.AHVMA.org or consult with vet homeopath if possible http://www.doctordym.com If still eating consider oncosupport from Rx Vitamins company which you can find on line

    [Reply]

  3. Barb Campbell
    Posted October 10, 2012 at 1:43 am | Permalink

    My puppy will be 10 weeks old shes due for her 2nd set of shots Oct 22nd. Shes been fine up until about an hour ago when she started drooling and breathing heavy. Ive tried to call her vet but with no answeron the emergency number. I need help!

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Take to nearest emergency clinic for evaluation as not much you can do at home.

    [Reply]

  4. Dana
    Posted November 4, 2012 at 1:25 am | Permalink

    My kitten is drooling he is 3months olds – is there anything to give him to ease the pain of teething? He has had his shots and the vet saw him drool but didn’t feel it was anything serious. teething made sense. Are there remedies or recomendations for easing the discomfort or pain for a kitten?

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    I doubt it is teething but I would check with your vet. If truly teething the homeopathic remedy calcaria phosphorica can help in many cases at a potency of 6c potency 1 pellot twice daily. Can get this from health food store.

    [Reply]

  5. Elvina Walker
    Posted April 30, 2013 at 5:25 pm | Permalink

    My cat has started drooling and licking his lips a lot what could this be is he sick?

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Many possibilities including nausea from virus, toxicity, etc. Best to have vet exam if persists.

    [Reply]

  6. Amanda
    Posted May 6, 2013 at 8:23 pm | Permalink

    I just applied some Frontline Plus on my cat where I believe was just below her shoulder blades about an hour and a half ago. I then fed her about 20 minutes ago and when she was finished eating she started excessively drooling and darting around the room. Could she have somehow licked the Frontline and is having a reaction? She does not normally have this reaction when getting the flea drops put on her.

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Sounds like possible reaction. She may have ingested small amount of the front line. See vet if signs persist for supportive care.

    [Reply]

  7. frank
    Posted June 3, 2013 at 9:20 pm | Permalink

    My cat has started drooling accessivly and stopped grooming herself. She also has or looks like her eyes are watering and gets a build up in the corners.

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Best to have vet exam and evaluation to help sort out underlying possible causes.

    [Reply]

    Immuneiq Reply:

    Hi frank Is your cat still experiencing drooling also right now?.. Are you still struggling with this issue? If so, I can reply to you here or faster via email if you still need help, at answers@immuneiq(com) – Cynthia”

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Please do not advertise your products on this forum. Thank you.

    [Reply]

  8. Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian
    Posted July 13, 2013 at 5:55 am | Permalink

    Please do not advertise your products on this forum.

    [Reply]

  9. Amanda
    Posted September 22, 2013 at 6:51 pm | Permalink

    I have a 14 yr old cat , started drooling today and a little bit of blood coming from his nose , he wont eat or drink, his gums are white as well and don’t seem very comfortable.. iam taking him to the vet in the morning but they are closed on the weekends where i am located .. he has no known health problems that iam aware of.. and has always been a indoor cat, anyone know what might be the problem?

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Severe anemia is likely which can be due to chronic viral infections like Felv/FIV, severe parasitism with fleas or worms, as well as chronic disease,, including bacterial infections and cancer. Need to see vet ASAP. good luck

    [Reply]

  10. Shmyra
    Posted November 23, 2013 at 6:49 pm | Permalink

    Hi,
    My year old cat suddenly started drooling. She had recently been out on my balcony when I noticed her run back inside. She made a yowling noise and jumped on my bed. I then noticed a coupios amount of clear frontage from her eyes and she looked as if she were trying to swallow something. I immediacy grabbed her and attempted to rinse out her mouth with water and inspect her mouth. She now is acting like her usual self and grooming. I gave her a treat to see if she would eat and she did. Her bowel sounds are hyperactive but her lungs sound fine. Should I be concerned?

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Perhaps she got into something like a lizard or frog that was outside or some other toxic exposure. Monitor her. If drooling continues or worsens, see vet in your area. In my area of Florida, sometimes toads and lizards can cause this reaction.

    [Reply]

  11. Tracey
    Posted January 28, 2014 at 1:43 pm | Permalink

    Hi we are dog sitting a black Labrador he is 9 and around 4 hours ago he has started to hyper salivating and drooling everywhere it won’t stop and he is drinking more water than usual What should we do???

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Need to have vet exam and assessment including possibly blood work and x rays to sort this out

    [Reply]

  12. Posted February 25, 2014 at 7:35 am | Permalink

    My dog weights is 14 lbs, she has been having Bronchitis, vet gave her antibiotic, worked a little, now she seems worse also experiencing very red inner mouth with lesions, her temp is also 100.1 talked to vet, wanted to give her a steroids, but she’s allergic to them, but she eats and drinks okay, just lays around which is not normal.what can I do now?? 3

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    You could ask vet about meds to dilate airways such as theophylline, as well as possibly low dose steroid combination therapy with meds like temaril p which I have seen help many of these dogs.

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Ask vet about prescription theophylline as well as low dose steroid combination med temaril p which I have seen work great with little side effects in most pets

    [Reply]

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