PetMeds® Herbal Arthritis Treatment

 
Filed under Dr. Dym's Vet Blog
Always tell your veterinarian if you are using any over the counter arthritis supplements or herbal supplements on your pet if he/she is also on pain pet meds With the increased interest in complimentary veterinary medicine and more holistic treatment options for pets, one of the most rapidly growing areas in veterinary medicine are the use of supplements in augmenting management of many common canine and feline chronic health problems.  One of the top growing areas is the use of such supplements in helping manage arthritis.

In addition to some of the wonderful newer and safer prescription nonsteroidal anti inflammatory drugs on the market such as Rimadyl, Deramaxx and Previcox to name a few, herbal supplement use has grown as well.  It is important, however, to always tell your veterinarian if you are using any over the counter arthritis supplements or herbal supplements on your animal, because there is the potential of drug interactions, as well as a thinning of the blood and/or more predisposition to bleeding if too many medications are used in combination.

For example, one of the more common natural remedies I will often suggest to my clients is the herb white willow bark, which is readily available from most health food stores.  Often called “natural aspirin,” due to a similar chemical makeup, it can help decrease inflammation and pain.  However, because of its chemical similarity to aspirin, white willow bark should never be used at the same time as aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti inflammatory treatment. Periodic monitoring should be done at the local veterinarian, even when using a natural derivative like white willow bark, because there is a small risk of digestive upset, bleeding and liver/kidney issues even with natural products.

Some of the other herbs I have found useful in arthritis management include the herb Yucca, readily available in useful supplement called Yucca Intensive.  Others include Turmeric, Boswelia, and the ayurvedic herb ashwagandha. I will sometimes use combination products like Dog Gone Pain and Inflamatone in conjunction with omega 3 fatty acids such as Be Well or Super Pure Omega 3, and other antioxidants such as Proanthozone. And of course there are glucosamine/chondroitin supplements such as Super Joint Enhancer or Glyco-Flex I – III, depending upon the severity of the symptoms.  As long as they are judiciously used, and under the guidance and supervision of your local veterinarian, herbal therapies can indeed play a significant role in helping pets with chronic arthritis and pain.

Read Related Posts on PetMeds Blog:

  1. PetMeds®: Do Nutritional Supplements Work for Dogs and Cats?
  2. PetMeds® How to Help a Limping Dog
  3. PetMeds® Using Joint Supplements with Pain Pet Medications
  4. Pet Medications to Help Your Pet’s Joint Problems
  5. PetMeds® Is Asprin Safe for Dogs?

13 Comments

  1. Jhon Sendler
    Posted October 14, 2010 at 11:13 am | Permalink

    All live with the pain is painful, but you can find information on findrxonline which can damage your health and believe that as helped me, so can you and your pet..

    Jhon Sendler.
    Findrxonline

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Thanks for sharing your experience. I am sure others will benefit.

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  2. Wendy Burnette
    Posted May 17, 2011 at 10:21 am | Permalink

    Can herbal arthritis treatment be given with Deramaxx?

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Most of time herbal arthritis treatments are fine with deramaxx. HOwever always check with your veterinarian first, as occasionally in pets with bleeding tendencies or diabetes for example there can be rare contraindications of using herbal treatments.

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  3. Posted June 9, 2011 at 7:35 am | Permalink

    Is it okay to treat the pets with the natural remedies…?? Are these remedies are beneficial in curing the animal disease or not..??

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Yes many natural products like yucca intensive, glucosamine supplements such as super joint enhancer and antioxidants and fatty acids can indeed help many pets with arthritis. See your local vet for guidance on which products are most appropriate for your dog.

    [Reply]

  4. Posted April 12, 2012 at 8:01 pm | Permalink

    Great Info You’ve got here, I really appreciate it. Hope to get more!

    [Reply]

  5. Robin
    Posted September 13, 2012 at 1:54 pm | Permalink

    Per my naturopath vet, my 12 yr old Lab has been using Glyco-Flex I for quite some time, but lately she seems to be getting significantly worse. She is also taking a phosphorus supplement approx every two months. After reading labels, I think she should be on Glyco-Flex III. Is it ok to take her up to that level? I don’t have the $100 needed right now for an email reply from my naturopath vet.

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    The glycoflex IIi would be fine to try. Also consider other joint supplements like proanthozone from 1800petmeds, as well as yucca intensive.

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  6. Robin
    Posted September 15, 2012 at 12:34 pm | Permalink

    So I’ve now read up on Proanthozone and Yucca Intensive. In a prior reply you say Glyco-Flex III would be fine to try – but also consider other joint supplements like the above. I want to choose the best cocktail without ruining her liver or other functions. My dog is a 12 year old lab with severe arthritis in her back legs. She also has some labored breathing when walking which tells me she might have some fluid build up. She is otherwise a healthy happy loving dog. Suggestions?

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    The supplements you ask about would all be good to try; proanthozone; yucca intensive and glycoflex III

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  7. Posted March 13, 2013 at 5:30 pm | Permalink

    I have a 13-14-year-old chocolate lab suffering from really bad hip dysplasia and congestive heart failure. He still has the want to be active, but suffers from above ailments. Wondering if he would benefit or be okay with using proanthozone +Yucca intensive +Glycolflex lll on top of Rimadyl?

    [Reply]

    Clinton Peters Reply:

    Scratch the above question/statement.

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    I see no problem using all of these supplements for these conditions.

    [Reply]

  8. Patsy
    Posted March 27, 2013 at 7:10 am | Permalink

    I have a 12 yr old lab and she has all the signs of arthritist in her back hips and leggs it breaks my heart to see her like this and she is over weight i cant get her walk that long anymore but she doese go out side for her potty time have to help her up down the steps sometimes but she dont give up,so what do you suggest i need to get her better.

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Start with natural joint supplements like super joint enhaner from 1800petmeds, as well as antioxidants like proanthozone. Also consider fatty acid supplement like be well as well as yucca intensive which may help as well.

    [Reply]

  9. Robin
    Posted March 28, 2013 at 12:39 am | Permalink

    Patsy

    Check w your vet about giving Rimadyl. It really helps with the pain along with the things Dr Dym suggested. . Then get her up and out every day to walk some. I started w my 13 yr old lab to the mailbox, once a day up to three times a day just to get her up off the bed. We increased that to a house or two down the street and worked up to the end of the block and back. Every day we went a little farther and I made sure she got up and walked. Otherwise she’d lay on her bed all day and get weaker. We’re now walking the trail at a nearby park about. 1/2 mile. The more she walks the more fit she becomes. You have to get the weight off her if you want her to survive a while longer and with some quality of life. Walk. Can’t say it enough. And w Rimadyl you’ll notice an immediate change. Good luck.

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Hi Robin…..Thanks for sharing…..Motion and mobility is so important for healing of all joints. Not confinement.

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  10. Sissy Criss
    Posted September 3, 2013 at 1:34 am | Permalink

    I have a 14 year old Wire Fox Terrier. He is currently taking Previcox 57mg. every other day,Levothyroxine 100mg. one and one-half every 12 hours, Amantadine 20 mg. once daily and Complete by Kinetic a joint, coat, and antioxident once daily. The Complete has 500 mg of glucosamine plus other ingredients.Someone I know suggested I put him on a supplement called Advance Cetyl M Joint Action Formula for dogs. My concern is the Complete has 500 mg of gluscosamine and the Cetyl M has 250 mg of gluscosamine, is that to much for a dog that only weighs 17-18 lbs ?

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    The glucosamine may a bit high. i would rather have you go for a different antioxidant all together. Try the combination antioxidant called Life Vantage by Canine Health. This wonderful antioxidant reduces oxidative stress in pets’ bodies and can compliment what you have. To learn more and to order it go to http://www.mylifevantage.com/drdym

    [Reply]

  11. Posted September 11, 2013 at 7:36 am | Permalink

    I love this post very much.please keep sharing of knowledges with us.

    [Reply]

  12. Posted September 23, 2013 at 9:39 am | Permalink

    What can replace 1/2 of a 57mg previcox tablet for an 18 lb bicheon with arthritis?

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    I would ask your vet for script for metacam….

    [Reply]

    Maryanne Reply:

    The reply is not complete. Would you please reply in full sentences?

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Not really sure what you mean. I recommended prescription metacam. Dose for 18 pound dog is 18 units once daily. You will need written script from your vet. OTher questions?

  13. Rebecca Arndt
    Posted December 10, 2013 at 9:07 am | Permalink

    We have a 5 year old Neapolitan Mastiff. We got him at 2 and soon after he started hitching up his back left leg. We took him to the vet who said he had a problem in the ligament in that leg. He said it is common in Mastiffs and he knew of only one vet near us in Texas who operated on dogs that big.
    Our farrier had recommended Cetyl M for one of our horses who was having stiffness in joints…he had had remarkable success himself with the human form (CM Response) on himself. So I tried the Cetyl M for Dogs and have been maintaining him on it since. He stopped hitching up his leg after about two months and I haven’t seen him do it since. He goes for long walks in the woods with me and the other dogs and he is active. I also swim with him in the summer in the nearby lake.

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Hi Rebecca. Thanks for sharing. I have used Cetyl m in my practice. The product I have had success with is called myristin and Myristaid by company EHP products.

    [Reply]

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