Long Term Use of Prednisone in Pets

 
Filed under Dr. Dym's Vet Blog

There can be side-effects from long-term use of Prednisone.

One of the more commonly prescribed drugs in veterinary medicine is the drug Prednisone. The most common use of this medication is as an anti-inflammatory agent used in a wide variety of  chronic diseases, including chronic inflammatory bowel disease, chronic skin/ear allergies, chronic respiratory disease and asthma, as well as chronic neurologic disorders. Prednisone has also been used as an immune suppressive agent in immune mediated disorders of the body, as well as part of many chemotherapy protocols.

When used appropriately, short-term use of Prednisone does not have a lot of side effects in animals; however, when used long- term, there are increased risks of toxicity and side effects. Common side effects include increased thirst/urination, appetite and respiratory rate, as well as changes in behavior from lethargy to hyperexcitability. Secondary organ problems of the pancreas (including diabetes and pancreatitis), liver and adrenal glands may occur. Thinning of the bone and skin also may occur with long term use of Prednisone. Secondary viral and/or bacterial infections in any organ system may occur, especially of the urinary tract and skin. In some sensitive pets, gastrointestinal erosion and ulceration may occur, leading to bleeding and possibly anemia.

Whenever a pet is on long-term Prednisone, it is always worthwhile asking about other alternative drugs, including other anti-inflammatory agents, including antihistamines, as well as other immune suppressive agents such as cyclosporine. Herbal remedies such as licorice may also be helpful in some cases. Most pets, however, can be maintained on chronic low-dose alternate day Prednisone therapy for a long time, as long as periodic veterinary exams and labwork are done to detect any possible side effects.

Read Related Posts on PetMeds® Blog:

  1. PetMeds® Using Atopica to Manage Your Pet’s Allergies
  2. Giving Your Dog or Cat Cortisone (Prednisone/Prednisolone)
  3. Malabsorption Syndrome in Pets
  4. PetMeds®: Cyclosporine – Friend or Foe?
  5. PetMeds® Holistic Allergy Treatments for Dogs

84 Comments

  1. Greg Walker
    Posted February 21, 2012 at 8:34 pm | Permalink

    My dog has inflammatory bowel disease and has gone through a whole first prescription of prednisone and gained a little weight. After being off of it for a short period of time she lost substantial weight again. Are there any other medicines available to treat this disorder? I think this disorder was originally brought on by a large seizure experienced by my dog when it was 1 year old but have no proof. I read somewhere that a drug used to treat crohn’s disease in humans could possible be used. The dog is a pitbull but is hovering around the 30 some pound mark. You can see all of her ribs. Do you have any thoughts?

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    You can try yucca intensive by azmira which has cortisone like natural herbs in it.

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Prednisone may be needed for longer period of time. I would ask about drug called metronidazole, as well as consider changing to natural home made diet such as raw meat based diet. Look at natures variety on 1800petmeds. Also add enzymes and probiotics to meals such as naturevet enzymes and Fast balance. You can also consider supplement called fidomucil which you can get from http://www.animalessentials.com

    [Reply]

  2. Sam Ward
    Posted August 20, 2012 at 5:42 pm | Permalink

    My 7.5 yr old Rottweiler is an allergic mess. We have been doing Allercept immuno therapy and are approaching a year into the therapy. Thus far, the immuno therapy isn’t not having any effect. He has been taking hydroxizine for many years now and it doesnt help either. I have been extremely diligent about both his antihistamines and his immuno therapy despite the fact that neither has really helped.

    The only thing that has ever given him any relief is prednisone. Though I will continue to hold on to the hope that one day the immuno therapy will start working, I want to know what is considered “long term use” for steroids?

    Understanding that long term use of steroids can cause problems in the long run and I dont want to shorten his life or quality of life anymore than it will be.

    Though I dont know the exact dosage offhand, he has had no more than 4-5 prednisone shots per year for about 3 years now. The shot gives him relief for about 2 months. With the long term effects i’ve read in mind, I have done my best to spread those shots out as far as i can.

    Any insight on if my case would be considered long term and possibly harmful use would be much appreciated. Thanks

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Sounds like you are doing everything possible. Intermittent prednisone is usually not a problem, as long as periodic labwork is done to check for hidden other health issues. I would consider a home made diet as described in book Dr Pitcairns guide to natural health for dogs and cats by Richard Pitcairn, DVM, phd which has some excellent suggestions. Also consider holistic therapy known as NAET which you can google for animals on line and see if you can find a vet in your area skilled this allergy elimination technique that can often work wonders in allergic dogs.

    [Reply]

    Sam Ward Reply:

    Thank you very much. So would consider what I described as Intermittent? I just havent been able to get a solid answer on what kind of usage would be considered harmful in the long run. Thanks again

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    3 to 4 shots a year of prednisone should not be a problem, although I prefer the injections not to be the long acting form known as depomedrol. your vet can tell if you that is what it is. In those cases, either shorter acting vetalog injections or perhaps oral prednisone tapered to lowest effective dose to control clinical signs would be best. Many dogs can be tapered to low dose every other day therapy, and that is safest way of using prednisone in animals. Also can ask your vet about different drug called atopica for allergies, although that drug much more expensive. Good luck.

  3. Amy
    Posted September 14, 2012 at 2:28 pm | Permalink

    I curious about using prednisone long-term to reduce inflammation… My dog is 11 or 12 and has had some recent issues with stability in her back legs and falling here and there. She wobbles a lot in her back end when she walks. I took her to the vet today since she has been falling a lot lately. The doctor said she more than likely has degeneration in her spinal column and is not getting good nerve conductance. He went through my options, scans, possibly surgery (depending what the official diagnosis is), no surgery… Due to her age and the cost of surgery, I am choosing to make her as comfortable as possible. She is currently on prednisone for allergies, so she currently cannot take what the doctor recommended, Rimadyl. Once her allergies die down, I would then be able to switch her to Rimadyl. Since she suffers from allergies most of the year, could I keep her on prednisone long term to treat any discomfort from spinal degeneration and allergy issues? Do you have any other recommendations?

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Low dose every other day prednisone therapy is usually ok long term as long as periodic blood work done, and no digestive or pancreatic side effects. You could also ask vet about prescription drug tramadol. Consider supplements like vetridisc from company vetriscience, and ligaplex II from company standard process which you can get on line. Also a good case for chiropractic and/or acupuncture. To find a vet trained in this see http://www.AHVMA.org

    [Reply]

  4. Paul
    Posted October 1, 2012 at 11:39 am | Permalink

    7 yr old female Corgi. She was diagnosed with Multifocal lesions affecting the maxillary branch of CNN 5 (left and right) and CNN 7 (left) and the cervical spine. Neuritis of the trigeminal/facial nerves and myelitis of the cervical spinal cord. She has been on Prednisone & Cyclosporine since July. The Predisone seems to take care of the constant pain she was experiencing and I am now administering 1/2 pill twice a day and 25mg Cyclosporine twice a day. She has been comfortable at that dosage. I would like to get her off the Prednisone completely and will try 1/2 pill once a day starting today until I’m out. I have extra Cyclosporine so will keep her on, 25mg once a day, until it’s gone. The Cyclosporine doesn’t seem to have any affect and is quite expensive and the initial doses were 100mg twice a day. Neurological specialist I’ve been seeing says try it and see what happens. I just don’t want her to have a reccurence of the pain. She has gained a few pounds on the Prednisone and has a bloated belly but her blood work is normal considering the meds. Is there anything new on the market, as far as inflamatory drugs, that we can try to get away from the Prednisone? Thanks.

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Not much other options. You could ask neurologist about alternative steroid like budesomide. Also consider working with holistic vet regarding acupuncture and chiropractic and diet for this condition as well.

    [Reply]

    Paul Reply:

    Just an update. Corgi is still with us after over two years on the Prednisone, 10mg twice daily. She will be 10 in December. She’s still alert and we have supplemented the Prednisone with Thyrozine, at the recommendation of our vet, and also give her a NuVet Plus vitamin pill daily which has had a dramatic effect in keeping her active. She has lost a lot of muscle mass most notably on her legs and head. He rhead is pretty much skin on bone and she bleeds quickly if banging heads with out other Corgi. All in all I thinks she’s happy and I believe the Predisone has kept her comfortable and functioning for the past two years. Her belly is bloated but Corgi’s are belly draggers anyway. We hope she makes it to het 10th birthday and cherish every day she’s still with us. Thanks.

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    HI Paul. Thanks for sharing. Glad to hear Corgi is still doing well

    [Reply]

    Paul Reply:

    We lost her last week. She had been having blood in her stool for about three weeks and she suddenly stopped eating and and wanting to do anything. She had been drinking copious amounts of water prior. It was all she could do to make it to the vet and he agreed it was time. Her gums were white and vet said that’s because of her internal bleeding and that she was getting anemic. Her liver was the size of a softball. We almost had her ten years but almost three years on the prednisone before it finally got her. Double edged sword really, we knew it would eventually get her but we did give her and extended life and she was happy until about the end. Thanks for the help!

  5. Chloe
    Posted November 5, 2012 at 1:35 pm | Permalink

    Hi, my dog ( a mini daschound about 11 lbs)has been on prednisone for about a year and a half for allergies. She had a terrible cough and hacking problem before and the prednisone cleared it right up. I tried to take her off the dosage, but after while the symptoms came back so she went back on it. I have her on as small a dose as I can. She gets a bit over 1 mg every 3 days, but now her symptoms are back again. She has even started making this wee zing sound she has never made before. Should I give her a higher dosage or should I look into finding another way to treat her? Can she build immunity to prednisone?

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    She may need a higher dose of prednisone for a period of time. I would check with your vet however on this before starting.

    [Reply]

  6. Adrienne
    Posted November 22, 2012 at 5:53 am | Permalink

    My old dog (a x-breed with German Shepherd in her and around15 years old) has suddenly lost her appetite. THe vet started her on prednosone on alternate days and that seemeed to spark her appetite on those days but she still ate very little. Then she stopped eating for 3 days. Now she is on an increased daily dose and eating again, but very little at a time and only certain foods. Her food tastes change daily so that I never know exactly what she is going to be prepared to eat on any day. If she doesn’t want to eat the food she sniffs it and turns her head away or else gets up and walks away. Is there anything else I should be doing for her

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    I would ask your vet for a proper diagnosis i.e blood work, etc to help with other supportive treatments.

    [Reply]

  7. Joan
    Posted December 11, 2012 at 10:49 am | Permalink

    I have a 9 yr old Bouvier with osteosarcoma. Her leg was amputated in June and she had 4 rounds of carboplatin. I was trying to get her in the U of PA trial for a bone cancer vaccine but her immune system tested too low to have any change to respond to the vaccine. her bone tumor tested positive for Her2-neu so she has a more aggressive form of osteosarcoma. By late-October, several tumors were visible in both lungs. Prognosis was 1 month maybe 2. At week 3 she developed a fever (103.8) and stopped eating. Dog was placed on Baytril for 1 week and 60mg prednisone. In two days she was eating and starting to enjoy life. She continued on Ciprofloxcin and prednisone (and Pepsid which she has been taking since July). I was told that after a month, the prednisone would need to be increased to remain effective. It is now day 27 on this protocol and my vet is on vacation out of the country. Last night she ate dinner slowly and left some and was panting more than normal. This morning her temperature is 102.1usually on prednisone her temperature is 100.0. Her eating is off but I didn’t get her to eat cooked chicken. How much should I increase her dosage? I gave her 75mg this morning. At this point, I am only trying to provide some quality of life in her final days. She still gets a kick trotting outside and visiting neighbor dog and sniffing for rabbits, so once again the priority is reducing the fever. Can you suggest dosage schedule and any other palliative measures your would consider.

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    I would see local vet in your area as I cant recommend increasing dose without first examining your dog. Sounds like you have done everything possible. Bumping up prednisone by 25% may be helpful but vet visit suggested first.

    [Reply]

  8. Amanda
    Posted December 11, 2012 at 7:36 pm | Permalink

    My dog was prescribed Prednisone 10mg, Doxycycline 100mg and Simplicef 100mg to help raise her platelit levels and to help kill Woolbachia, the secondary parasite assoc with heartworm disease. She also had some vaccinations, heartworm treatment and medication applied for fleas. A month later I took her to have her blood count rechecked and there was no improvement with her platelit levels. I was told she has an autoimmune disease (Evans Syndrome). She is currently on 20mg of Prednisone and 100mg Doxycycline. I would like to know if probiotics, digestive enzymes,krill oil, ubiquinol, joint support with biovaplex, cod liver oil, mushroom extract supplements, amino acid supplements, vitamin & minerals will ineract with the Prednisone and Doxycycline? If some that I’ve listed will, could you please list them and any other supplements that should be avoided? I strongly believe my dogs immune system was weak prior to the vaccinations, heartworm &flea medications and so her immune system was triggered by the toxins. Also I believe the underlying cause for her anemia has to do with the heartworms, could you give me your opinion on this? I was told to watch out for any bleeding and I seen a red tint in her feces earlier today as the sun light hit. Stools from yesterday appeared somewhat black in color as charcoal. Does this mean she is bleeding internally? I appreciate any and all help/advice you can give me, thanks in advance.

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Yes. Definitely not a dog I would have vaccinated given all of the health issues and problems. I agree on autoimmune disease. You list quite a bit of supplements. All can be potentially helpful. I dont see any problems with most of them, however it may be worthwhile to consult individually with a holistic vet who can review diet, supplements, etc in more detail. To learn more see http://www.doctordym.com Her heartworms can trigger autoimmunity but so can all of teh vaccinations and topical flea meds.

    [Reply]

  9. Amanda
    Posted December 11, 2012 at 7:59 pm | Permalink

    Thank you so much for your reply and if I may ask, could you give me your opinion on the red tinting I seen earlier today in her stool? I did give her strawberries last night, could they have caused the red tint? I didnt see them in their whole form so I’m skeptical. What about the charcoal colored stools from yesterday, could the color be a result from internal bleeding? Again thank you in advance for your help/advice.

    [Reply]

  10. Hilde
    Posted December 22, 2012 at 11:41 am | Permalink

    Hi all..exactly 1 year ago my 60 lb 4 year old flat coated retriever mix was diagnosed with IBD via endoscopy ( in his large intestine) He has been on and off prednisone since. As soon as we reduce the dosage to 5 mg a day he starts to have flair ups, not only with diarrhea but also skin sores. He is also on prescription hypoallergenic hydrolyzed protein diet…His case seems to be \chronic\
    The dosage of pred that seems to keep his system happy is 10 mg per day to keep the inflammation away, he also has regular blood work done every 6 months because of his condition and also because he is on the meds. IBD is a tough nut to crack, and in our case we monitor his stools daily, if he seems to be going soft, we up his dosage and then taper down..10 mg seems to be the miracle dosage for him. We are aware of the potential side effects, but the quality of his life is so important to us. If you suspect your pet has IBD, the only way to find out for sure is to have the endoscopy done ! IBD can be managed, but never cured. We did try the Budesonide at 3 mg daily, only to have a \very bad\ reaction, so like my vet set…Prednisone is the medication for him.

    Please keep your pet happy and healthy by regular vet visits, blood work etc. after all, they are a part of our family and we should treat them with all the unconditional love and compassion that they give to us !

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Thank you for sharing the success story of your dog and dealing with his IBD. I have found that as long as dogs are monitored long term with periodic exams and blood work that low dose daily to every other day corticosteroid therapy is tolorated by the body fine in most cases. I will however say that as an integrative veterinarian of 21 years experience both in traditional and complimentary medicine, there are many mild to moderate cases of IBD that can be managed through more natural diets and long term chronic constutional homeopathic therapy. To learn more see http://www.beyondflatearth.com as well as http://www.doctordym.com

    [Reply]

  11. Joyce
    Posted January 16, 2013 at 1:54 pm | Permalink

    I am trying to find out if prednisone affects the outcome of surgery in dogs. I had an eight-year-old collie who broke his leg (It appeared to have spontaneously broken) and I was told by the emergency vet that the prognosis of surgery on his leg was not good because of the prednisone he was on.

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Prednisone can slow down healing of fractures, but as long as pred tapered and stopped, surgery should be ok for a positive outcome. Also try the homeopathic remedy symphytum in 30c potency, given once weekly to help with fracture healing in my cxperience.

    [Reply]

  12. Tracey
    Posted January 17, 2013 at 4:35 am | Permalink

    My old Jack Russell Albert (nearly 15) has developed severe sensitivity to certain grasses, plants & gets unbearably itchy. He has been prescribed 3 courses of Pred 5mg which I taper off by gradually cutting the doses as advised & it is supposed to be fixed but then it comes back! It drives him crazy, comes on quickly & he is often crying in pain before I have time to get him to the vet for the next lot of pills. I would like to know if (a) it is dangerous to keep giving these to him (he has a heart murmer) & (b) if there is an alternative that I can just buy without having to book in to see the vet & keep on hand when it starts up without any bad side effects.
    Thanks
    Tracey

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    You cold maintain him on a good antihistamine such as hydroxyzine or benadryl or chlorphenirimine. While not as effective as pred, it may help calm the itching. Also using oral fatty acids like be well may help long term from 1800petmeds and supplements like yucca intensive. Pred can be used long term at low doses but pets need to be monitored with periodic bloodwork and urine checks , etc to guard against side effects.

    [Reply]

    Tracey Reply:

    Thank you for your response Dr Dym, before I got your reply I took my JR back to the vet (a new one as we moved) & he has changed his medication to regular prednil 1000 (which also contains an antihistamine) every 2nd to 3rd day but this dose doesn’t seem to be having any effect even if I give it every day. (the previous dose was 5mg Pred but tapering off over a few weeks to nothing). I need to increase the dose or change the drug & would like to know what is a safe low dose of pred for a 9kg JR (15 years old). Also what is an oral fatty acid & how does it work on itching?
    Thanks
    Tracey

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    For a 9 kg(20 pound) dog, 2.5 mg prednisone twice daily should be ok to start, but then taper every few days to lowest effective dose, hopefully eventually to every other or every third day. As for fatty acids, they can help with inflammation anywhere in the body when used over a long period of time, including allergies, arthritis, etc. Try nordic naturals omega 3 fatty acid from 1800petmeds which often works great.

  13. Posted January 18, 2013 at 4:10 am | Permalink

    My 14-year old shih-tzu with herniated disc spent much of 2012 on prednisone. From March-July he was on every other day 5 mg dose, reduced to every third day in August, and again to every third day for most of October and November after allergy season ended. In the 2-1/2 weeks after Thanksgiving I reduced the dose to 3.75 mg then 2.5mg and the dosing to every fourth day. He seemed just fine since then, until yesterday, he had a sore spot, and in looking it up, it seems to be in the location of his kidney/adrenal gland. It is no longer so sore today, but after looking up adrenal gland which led to reading about secondary Addison’s, I’m now concerned that I took him off steroids too quickly, although at the time every dose seemed toxic. The other signs I see is the skin on his belly is a darker dull pink, he has a little shudder at the end of some breaths for the last week, and urinates frequently, 5-6 times a day. He sleeps good, eats good, bowel movements are regular, but often dry/hard. He has a number of pink cauliflower growths, some dark spots on his skin here and there, and a large claw that became deformed all while on the prednisone that seem unchanged since being off it. Is there anything I should be watching for, or any testing he should have?

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    I dont think you took him off of the pred too quickly, and dont think the sore spot on his body is related to his adrenal glands. Chronic disc problems are not cured by prednisone so relapses can occur at any time. As for testing, I would have periodic blood work done at your vet twice yearly as I recommend in all older pets. If back problem or sore spots worsen, then have vet recheck. Other meds such as prescription tramadol may help. Also consider supplements like yucca intensive by azmira from 1800petmeds.

    [Reply]

  14. Posted January 18, 2013 at 4:13 am | Permalink

    Sorry, my 14-year old shih-tzu weighs 15.5 pounds.

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Duly noted.

    [Reply]

  15. Posted January 18, 2013 at 11:01 pm | Permalink

    Thank you so much!

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    You are very welcome.

    [Reply]

  16. Pat
    Posted January 23, 2013 at 4:29 pm | Permalink

    7 yo Siberian Husky with IBD, confirmed by EGD and colonoscopy. Stomach grossly inflamed and pliable. 2 very experience internists were unable to pass scope into small intestine. (+) biopsies from stomach and colon. On doxy 200mg/day for over a year (failed flatly trial and this seems to work). Started on prednisone in 10/20/12 following EGD confirmation. Now weaned to 5mg. Very sensitive to most foods and medications. Now with otitis, organism is methicillin resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius, sensitive to doxy. Needless to say, we are starting him on marbofloxacin. Benefits of doxy in light of meth resistant infection? Are we opening the door for more extensive abx resistant organisms? Other alternatives? Benefitting from prednisone, but even at lower dosages, would it be concerning for infections?

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Sounds like very complex case, where you have gotten excellent care from internists. Being on doxy so long does open up possibilities of resistant yeast and/or bacterial infections. Consider consulting with vet trained in Chinese medicine and/or homeopathy for alternative approach in my opinion and experience of 20 plus years as a conventional and holistic vet. You could try other immune modifying supplements like transfer factor http://www.tfpets.com Also learn more about homeopathy at http://www.beyondflatearth.com as well as my website http://www.doctordym.com Many homeopathic vets offer phone consultations, as do I nationwide.

    [Reply]

  17. Carol
    Posted February 2, 2013 at 5:52 pm | Permalink

    My 2 y/o cat has been diagnosed with chronic bronchitis and put on 5 mg Prednisone every other day. What are the long term side effects?

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Can include secondary infections, and occasional diabetes in cats.

    [Reply]

    Carol Reply:

    Just wanted to add a little history to my question above. After all the tests she went through she was diagnosed with chronic bronchitis. I was told since she was a rescue, not knowing what she may have been exposed to, she probably had an infection which caused irreversible lung disease and scarring. Do you think I should get another opinion? I know you said it is always worth it, just wondering if this diagnosis makes sense to you. I am trying not to over react but I want to make sure she has been diagnosed correctly. Thank you.

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Always best to get second opinion from preferably vet internist or specialist in internal medicine in case like this.

  18. Carol
    Posted February 2, 2013 at 5:53 pm | Permalink

    … I am not convinced of her dx, but she had chest xrays, bloodword and TTW to determine this dx.

    [Reply]

    Carol Reply:

    …blood work

    [Reply]

    Carol Reply:

    Thank you for replying. Do you think it is worth another opinion, even after all these tests?

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Always worth getting a second opinion from a vet who can examine your cat in your area.

  19. Pat Mullin
    Posted February 3, 2013 at 9:38 am | Permalink

    Dr Dr. Dym
    I have a 13 y.o. cat with IBD. It is a very complicated case. He had diarrhea for over a year. Tried Amoxi, Flagyl and chemotherapy. Novel protein diet failed. Probiotics worsened his diarrhea. Stool testing was negative. Tigan failed. Only hi dose pred worked. He was on daily pred 20 mg over a year and developed hyperglycemia and my vet wanted to start Insulin. I took him to an endocrinologist and she agreed that the cat needed Insulin. I refused to start insulin until the pred was stopped. When I tapered the pred his diarrhea returned. He was so thin with muscle wasting and looked so terrible – his skin was hanging off his skeleton. I was about to put the cat down but decided to put him on a raw meat diet (Feline Pride). I was very against raw meat for animals (I am an Infection Control Nurse and former vet tech) but tried it as a last ditch attempt. Overnight his diarrhea disappeared. I tapered the pred and he was fine for over a year. However now he is losing weight but has no diarrhea (went from 20 lbs to 13 lbs). He is eating but vomiting intermittently. He was worked up completely for intestinal lymphosarcoma and everything was normal except for diffuse inflammation on ultrasound. B12 and specialized lab tests were all normal (there were so many specialized tests done that I don’t even remember the names of them. Whatever was recommended I said do it). Pancreatitis work up revealed nothing. My vet started Budesonide daily. She said he will have to be on it for his life. He is doing better on the drug but I am concerned about what side effects there are long term concerning his prior problem with hyperglycemia on pred. My vet said there are less systemic effects than pred since it is concentrated in the gut. What are you thoughts about Budesonide long term?
    Thanks in advance for your help.
    pat

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    HI Pat. As far as I know budesonide is safer than prednisone in pets, but is still at steroid. The risk of diabetes is still there but lower. You could also ask your vet about the drug leukeran or chlorambucil, which can often be helpful at same time as steroids in severe IBD cases. Other option would be to work with veterinary homeopath. To learn more see http://www.beyondflatearth.com as well as my website http://www.doctordym.com Many homeopathic vets offer phone consultations.

    [Reply]

  20. Posted February 10, 2013 at 11:49 am | Permalink

    My “15-ish” poodle/cocker mix female has been on a low dose of prednisone, every other day, for the last three years..arthritic hips. Is it safe to put her on a topical flea treatment medication? (eg: Advantix, Frontline, etc)

    Thanks,
    Teresa

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Using topical pesticides in geriatric patients can be risky in some patients. check with your local vet. You could also consider natural alternatives such as http://www.wondercide.com

    [Reply]

  21. Brad Davis
    Posted February 12, 2013 at 8:44 am | Permalink

    I have an 8 year old 30 lb. beagle. His symptoms started with coughing that led into a dry wretch, and then a few weeks after that, the sneezing started. The violent, mucous producing sneezing occurred for roughly 6 months with visits to our vet during that span. Nothing seemed to work, we tried Benadryl, Zyrtec, to no avail. Finally, as a last resort the vet prescribed Prednisone. We first were dosing him @ 10 mg daily. After 5 days of the steroid and no results and we were sent to a specialist. We then were told to change his food (we were giving him Science Diet small bites, and then switched to a hypo-allergenic blend of Royal Canin) as well as 200mg daily of Doxycycline and upped the Prednisone to 30mg daily. The sneezing has gone considerably down, but the Prednisone’s side effects are really taking hold. Black stool, lethargy, increased thirst/urination. They scaled the dosage back to 20mg daily and he has been on that dosage for about 3 days now. Is this safe? It seems like an awful high dosage and we have noticed other odd behavoir- difficulty jumping onto the bed (which is allowed). We are going to our vet tomorrow for a blood test regarding the black stool- but my main question is can we start weaning him off the Pred?

    Thanks for any input.

    Brad

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    HI Brad. The 20 mg of prednisone is alot to me in a 30 pound dog. I would indeed ask vet about weaning down on steroid possibly to 10 mg or lower. Also ask about a definitive diagnosis of nasal problem, so that long term treatment plan can be safely started.

    [Reply]

  22. D. Christopher
    Posted February 16, 2013 at 5:23 pm | Permalink

    My akita has been on prednisone for the year and eight months, 30 mg daily to control atopic dermititis. Her anti-bodies attack her entire skin and it crusts over without it. She has recently developed arthritis in her hind legs and quite possibly begining in her front legs. She has also been taking cephalexin. She has now been prescribed tramadol for the pain. I live in an upstairs apartment. Thank god they are on the inside of the apt. because she can no longer climb the stairs. She stays at the bottom of the stairs and the area is very small. We have to maneauver around the door to get out. I’ve taken her to her vet and was told she also has cataracts. She eats well, but has difficulty peeing and pooping because her legs won’t support her for long. I fear for her. I know that large dogs usually have some issues, but, is this a result of the prednisone? What are her chances? What can I do for her? I am on a fixed income and don’t want to lose my baby because I can’t afford treatment other than her pills. Please help!

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    I would consider excellent joint supplements like super joint enhancer from 1800petmeds as well as the antioxidant proanthozone. Also add fish oil to meals like nordic naturals pet omega 3 fatty acid from 1800petmeds. See if these help over several weeks.

    [Reply]

  23. Posted March 2, 2013 at 12:20 am | Permalink

    Hello Doctor,

    We have a 6 year old Rhodesian Ridgeback who is diabetic. She is on 10 units of insulin twice a day. She was diagnosed with distemper about 4 weeks ago. She has gotten through the runny nose and eye stage and how seizures on and off. She is on 30mg of phenabarbital twice a day. We think should also be taking a something for the inflamation in her brain. What would you recommend? She is about 48 lbs. We have heard that prednisone can be good for that.

    Thanks so much,
    Laurie

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Hi Laurie…..Prednisone is not wise to use in dogs with diabetes as it can make that condition worse and/or more dificult to manage. Your case sounds interesting as distemper is VERY RARE in the adult dog population. I have seen reactions in this breed from vaccinations either distemper or rabies vaccinations ironically. Might be good case to consult with a veterinary homeopath. To learn more see http://www.beyondflatearth.com as well as my website http://www.doctordym.com MAny homeopathic vets offer phone consultations as do I.

    [Reply]

  24. JULIE
    Posted March 21, 2013 at 2:18 am | Permalink

    Hi Dr. Dym
    Our 6 yo West Highland Terrier has suspected Pemphigus auto-immune disease. Bridge to nose is losing colour, crusts around lips, weepy eye. She has had long term problems with her skin which has been controlled reasonably well with the Hills Science Ultra diet. Our vet strongly suggests a biopsy to determine the strain of disease so it can be treated accordingly. My concern, assuming it is the less serious pemphigus, is the long term effects of treatment with prednisol as I understand the dosage to manage this disease is quite high. I am curious to know what sort of quality and length of life is she likely to have whilst on prednisone after the biopsy is done? Thanks for your help :o )

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Many dogs with this condition can be successfully managed with prednisone and/or other immune suppressive medication, and hopefully doses can be tapered down as response occurs. There is always risk of some reaction to the drugs, which vets usually monitor for with periodic blood workup, etc. Other option would be to consider working with a homeopathic vet who looks at this disease differently and can potentially help overall health long term. To learn more about homeopathy see http://www.beyondflatearth.com as well as my website http://www.doctordym.com Many homeopathic vets do offer phone consultations.

    [Reply]

  25. Lisa
    Posted March 31, 2013 at 9:36 pm | Permalink

    I have a 9-yr old GSD with progressing spondylosis. She had a fall in Feb that resulted in worsening symptoms indicative of a spinal injury. We had her on the usual high dose Prednisone for 5 days, then titering down to 1/2 pill every other day. She was doing much better, so I reduced the Prednisone and started her back on Previcox. However, within 3 days she once again could no longer get up on her own and had the wobblies. I stopped the Previcox and after 72-hours started the Prednisone at 1 pill given in halves 2x daily for the last 3 days and she is doing very well. It appears that this is the only way to allow her comfort and quality of life, but can I keep her on Pred long-term?? She is also taking Tramadol, 2-3x daily as pain indicates.

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Sounds like prednisone may be only drug that can help her and should probably be used long term at lowest effective dose. Also consider working with vet trained in acupuncture as well http://www.AHVMA.org to find vet in your area which can also help dramatically in many cases.

    [Reply]

  26. Alex
    Posted May 15, 2013 at 1:13 pm | Permalink

    I have a pit bull terrier that is 4 months old and 30 lbs. Recently, he’s developed an allergy to something. I’m not sure what it is. He has bumps all over and some of them have puss sometimes. He’s scratching a lot. I have not changed his diet since he started eating dry foods, which is natural choice lamb and rice. He doesn’t get treats or eat any house food at all ever. He does, however, like to romp around in the backyard. I’m sure it’s something from the yard, but the guesses are many as to what it could be.

    My question is that I had some leftover Prednisone 5 mg left from my other dog that has sensitive skin (chihuahua 7 lbs). I want to give him the right dosage for his weight. Obviously, I’m pretty sure that the same dosage for my chihuahua does NOT apply. So what is recommended? I gave him 1/2 (2.5) about an hour ago only because I’m concerned, but I’m pretty sure that dosage won’t do anything for him. Please assist. I’d like to prevent a $600 vet visit just to get the same medication.

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Dose of pred in a 30 pound animal is 5 mg once to twice daily initially until response and then taper slowly. I cant recommend this drug unless your vet prescribes it. Keep in mind that problem with prednisone and especially starting at this young age is tendency to relapse with worse itching when drug is stopped.

    [Reply]

    Alex Reply:

    Thank you for your response Dr. Would Zyrtec be better? I’ve read that it helps. And I put some Vitamin E oil on him just now to help with the dry skin. I’d like to try the Zyrtec tomorrow and give it 24 hours before I take him in to the vet, just to see if that does help.

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    I have little experience using zyrtec. you could try benadryl at dose of 1 mg per pound twice daily.

  27. Alissa
    Posted May 27, 2013 at 12:21 am | Permalink

    My cat, who is now 5, started having periodic seizures when he was 2, shortly after receiving a rabies booster. His vet did not make the connection. Then he had a 3-year rabies vaccine at the end of December, and has been very sick ever since. He had another seizure 9 days after having the vaccine. A few weeks later, he lost his appetite, lost a bunch of weight and became very lethargic. I am now taking him to an integrative vet who at first prescribed natural remedies. When these didn’t work after a month, he put him on a very high does of prednisolone, 7.5 mgs. twice a day. My cat was on this dose for 3 weeks. He was eating more, but not responding as well as he should have. His vet then recommended ozone therapy. After 2 treatments, my cat was improving. He had perked up, was eating well and gained weight. His vet then began weaning him off of the pred. But after the 4th ozone treatment, my cat took a nosedive, stopped eating, became lethargic again and lost a bunch of weight. His vet wants me to get him back on a higher does of pred: 5 mgs. twice a day. I am concerned about this. Any insight would be greatly appreciated.

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Prednisone is always an option. you may want to consider working with a classical homeopath on a case like this who prescribes homeopathic remedies individually based on pet’s constitution. To learn more about homeopathy, see http://www.beyondflatearth.com as well as my website http://www.doctordym.com Many homeopathic vets like myself do offer phone consultations.

    [Reply]

    Alissa Reply:

    Thank you for your reply. I had a consult with his vet tonight, who was actually leaning toward putting him down. I am against this because no one has been able to figure out what is wrong with him. He has had numerous tests: x-rays blood work twice, echocardiogram and sonogram. All were normal, except for non-specific inflammation in his abdomen, which his vet was treating as IBD, with no success. I also took him to the University of Pennsylvania and they also could not come up with a diagnosis. So they, too, treated this as IBD. His current vet said he could have cancer. But none of the tests indicated this. And unless I knew this for sure, I would hate to put him down. Meanwhile, I have a friend who is a holistic vet who recommended a homeopathic detox. She sent me some heavy metal and lymphatic detox remedies. His vet has agreed to try this because he did determine through muscle testing that my cat got sick due to a reaction to the heavy metals in the rabies vaccines. The vet told me to get my cat off all of the meds, including the pred, cold turkey. I am terrified, but feel this is the last resort. Wish us luck!

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Good luck Alissa. In future you may want to consider a more classical homeopathic approach. To learn more about classical homeopathy and vets trained in that specific modality see http://www.TheAVH.org http://www.beyondflatearth.com as well as http://www.doctordym.com

    Alissa Reply:

    Hi,
    I haven’t been here for a while. I am very sad to say that I had to put my cat down on June 17 because his vet’s associate finally discovered that he had vaccine-associated sarcoma, due to being over-vaccinated. Apparently, the pred suppressed the cancer. After he was off this for a few weeks, the sarcoma appeared. I am about to adopt a new kitten. I have learned a sad, hard lesson.

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Hi Alissa. My heart and thoughts are with you. I am sorry to hear of your loss. I would recommend the wonderful book The Natural Cat, by Anitra Frazier to learn more about more natural and healthier methods of raising cats. Also see my website http://www.doctordym.com

    Alissa Reply:

    Thanks. I am very familiar with that book. I will definitely be much more cautious this time around.

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    I think it is wonderful book. I work with Anitra on raising health of cats naturally and holistically and did contribute to her wonderful book. Let me know if I can help with your new kitten.

  28. Michael Lynch
    Posted June 9, 2013 at 8:34 am | Permalink

    My 10 year olg female pug is a mess. She has always had allergies and has been on meds most of her life. She is currently on 3 meds. Prednisone, Simplicef, and Ketocnazole. This is making her pee in the house and even a bowel movement in the house. She has never ever done this before. She has been on it for 3 days it started the second day. Is this a normal side effect?

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Some pets are sensitive to side effects of prednisone. Check with your vet about lowering dose or prednisone.

    [Reply]

  29. Pamela Sanderson
    Posted July 18, 2013 at 11:24 pm | Permalink

    My 16 year old male shorthair has been diagnosed with Chron’s Disease about a year ago. He was a rescue cat they were going to euthanize because he was a black cat. I couldn’t afford the extensive X-Rays and in depth testing and I was very fortunate to find a Dr willing to work with me on testing the prednisone to see if he in fact had Chrons. The Dr. put him on Prednisone 5mg for about a week with a B12 shot and then back to 2.5mg (half a pill) daily in the morning. His symptoms tend to come and go now- especially as the day wears on to evening. As I notice diarrhea and vomiting pertaining to eating I generally give him another 1/2 a pill that evening if needed. (He used to do ok with 2.5mg but lately I find him needing that extra dose at night) He is VERY picky with foods that he will eat and that varies on a day to day basis so I end up keeping all sorts of flavors on hand if he isn’t up to options A or B. He can hold down most classic pate fancy feast, and sometimes protein based raw chicken meal dry food. I end up giving him 4 cans a day and he will likely eat 2 – 3 on a good day of what I put down. I have tried the fancier organic and healthier canned foods and he turns his nose at them. He definitely drinks a lot as a side-effect of that pill. At a constant 8lbs he is too underweight in my eyes (I weigh him every few weeks or so trying to see if I can get him to gain at least several lbs) I also get him gluten free boar’s head all natural chicken or turkey breast cold cuts from the deli to increase his appetite and food intake on his off days and he can hold these with no issues. He is my baby so I do tend to spoil him but I make sure his meat with no extra sauces or additives, I even cook him his own chicken breast on the side if I am making a chicken dish. Do you have any other suggestions on helping his weight improve? Would is it be dangerous long-term to keep him at 5 mg a day on a regular basis if it increases his quality of appetite and living?

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    AT this age, keeping him on 5 mg pred is probably ok. May even need higher. You could ask your vet about another drug called chlorambucil given every other day which I have found helpful in many cats with chronic severe inflammatory bowel disease or even cancer of the bowels. Adding digestive enzymes to meals such as naturevet enzymes from 1800petmeds also may be helpful. Try wysong epigen diet from 1800petmeds which I find many cats like or pet guard food from your local whole foods. Continue with B-12 shots every one to two weeks. Also consider the great antioxidant supplement protandim. To learn more about this product see the video http://www.abcliveit.com If you would like to order it for your cat or even yourself, go to http://www.mylifevantage.com/drdym

    [Reply]

  30. Stasia Napierska
    Posted July 31, 2013 at 3:32 pm | Permalink

    Hi, I have a 13 year old Staffordshire Bull Terrier, she was diagnosed 3 years ago with a mast cell tumour on her chest, the vet removed as much as she could and she was prescribed Prednisolone 5mg day and Ucerax antihistamine 25mg twice a day, this kept the tumour away for 3 years, due to arthritis the vet suggested taking her off the preds due to long term use and putting her on Previcox, half a 227mg tablet a day, her mobility improved but 1 year later the tumour is back. my old vet advised that if she had a flare up she could have a dose of steroids. I have spoken to my vet about this and she is happy for me to administer 2.5mg of preds up to 3 times a week, but it seems to flare up with this sporadic use. If I give the 2.5mg of preds every other day it helps considerably but this means she is getting it 4 times a week. She gets Milk Thistle, omega 3,6 & 9, K9 Immunity and transfer vits every day which seems to help as far as liver kidney function etc. Could this be dangerous or if not what are the negative signs I should look out for? Any advise would be greatly appreciated.

    [Reply]

    Stasia Napierska Reply:

    Oh, and to add, her stools are perfect, colour and consistency. Appetite is normal, activity daily etc. I keep a close eye on her and so any changes would be discussed with my vet. The preds take the swelling down almost within hours, also would it be ok to give her the Ucerax?
    Thankyou

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Not that familiar with Ucerax, but you could ask your vet about new drug for Mast cell tumors called Palladia

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Signs to look for are systemic signs of vomiting, fever, abdominal pain, difficulty breathing, etc I would also recommend the wonderful antioxidant called Canine Health By Life Vantage, which I have had great success with in practice in reducing oxidative stress in older patients. It is very similar to their human product called Protandim. To learn more about it see http://www.abcliveit.com To order Canine Health, go to http://www.mylifevantage.com/drdym I also love the cancer supplement oncosupport from Rx Vitamins now available from 1800petmeds.

    [Reply]

  31. Pamela Sanderson
    Posted July 31, 2013 at 5:42 pm | Permalink

    Thank you so much for responding. Glad to hear 5 mg is safe you’d think – however he is set up to get his check up on the 12th. When I give him 5 mg in the morning (2 half pills) he still seems fairly so-so on the tossing of cookies but its every few days or so – sometimes he can go a week still OK. I will look into the other additives – he wont take things slipped into his food however he is a good oral pill patient. Going to print this out and bring it with me when I go to the vets so I dont miss anything. Thanks again! I’ll be sure to shop 1800 pet meds for anything else he needs!

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    You are very welcome Pamela. Let me know if I can help in any further way. Good luck at the vet.

    [Reply]

  32. Mark Swindle
    Posted August 10, 2013 at 7:11 pm | Permalink

    My 10 1/2 year old lab has had allergies driving him crazy for the past couple of years. I have givien him allergic immuno-therapy shots, put him on a no grain diet, omega 3 chews, and just finished his third round of prednisone in two years. Also, i just Started a multivitamin with probiotics. Prednisone seems to be the only thing that works. If I gave him one 20 mg pill once a week would that be considered long term use or too hard on his body? Do you have any other suggestions?

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Try yucca intensive by azmira from 1800petmeds. Antioxidants like proanthozone also may help. 20 mg once weekly of prednisone will not likely cause a problem.

    [Reply]

  33. Vicki
    Posted August 11, 2013 at 3:10 pm | Permalink

    Hi, I have an 11-year-old Australian Shepherd neutered male. Every year around mid spring early summer he begins to itch severely and chews himself raw and bloody if we don’t have him treated. Every year when this would begin, the vet would give him a shot of prednisone, a week’s worth of prednisone pills, and a week’s worth of antibiotic. It works wonders. This year, a different vet in the group saw him and only gave him a Vetalog shot. That was one week and and there has been no change in his itching, chewing and licking, and, in fact, it seems like it’s getting worse. How soon after Vetalog can he be given his regular once-per-year prednisone treatment?

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Vetalog is actually STRONGER steroid than prednisone. You would have to wait 2 weeks before getting any other injections.

    [Reply]

  34. Rini Arvidson
    Posted September 12, 2013 at 9:21 pm | Permalink

    I have a 7.5 yr old pitbull with insulinoma. He is presently being treated with 10 mg prednisone twice a day since late February/early March. He has been doing very well until approximately 2-3 wks ago when we noticed he was developing large scabs under his fur on the top of his neck area. Our vet thinks it could be caused by the use of the prednisone so we have decreased the dosage to 5 mg twice a day and are treating the scabs with Mupirocin. I’m starting to find more scabs; however.

    Any thoughts or comments.
    Thank you.

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Perhaps he needs course of oral antibiotic like cephalexin or simplicef in case the scabs are from bacterial skin infection. Also add fatty acid to meals like nordic naturals pet omega 3 fatty acid from 1800petmeds. Also try proanthozone antioxidant. I also LOVE the antioxidant called Canine Health By Life Vantage in case like this, which I have used on my own pets. To order this product go to http://www.mylifevantage.com/drdym

    [Reply]

  35. Rhonda woods
    Posted September 29, 2013 at 6:26 am | Permalink

    my 15 year old cat has been on prednisone for almost 2 years. she has been having side effects here and there but today was not good. she has not eaten for 3 days and no water. lays by her water dish. i did get 2 eyedroppers full of water down her ,and she did not throw up. please help !

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Cat needs immediate vet exam and blood work to search for underlying diseases.

    [Reply]

  36. Jackie
    Posted November 11, 2013 at 2:31 pm | Permalink

    Hello, my dog was put on Prednisone a week ago because she has no mobility on the right side of her body to stand and walk. How long does it take for her to be able to walk again after taking this? She’s still taking it once a day now? She tries to get up but her front and back let won’t work for her to stand.

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Should work within several days. See vet for recheck if no improvement.

    [Reply]

  37. Jeanne Daniels
    Posted November 20, 2013 at 3:35 pm | Permalink

    Dear Dr. Dym,

    PLEASE FORGIVE THE LENGTH OF THIS HISTORY AND QUESTION. I felt that a good history would help you in being my second opinion on my question.

    I have a 12+ year old spayed female Appalachian Mountain Feist (every inch the Terrier of her heritage) which we have had since she was about 5 months old. Last year I felt that she had a lump on her abdomen but my husband did not feel it. My Vet verified that she had a lump (actually 2 via ultrasound) on her spleen and it was surgically removed and had a clean biopsy report. (My Vet has practiced 25 years in a now large, multi Vet state-of-the-art animal hospital and she said I was the first client to ever have discovered a lump on a dog’s spleen!)

    In May of this year we found a lump (caudal right thigh) that aspirated with excessive mast cells. Our Vet put the dog on prednisone with the intent of shrinking the tumor. The tumor did not shrink as much as our Vet had hoped (but it did get down to 5 cm – still about 2/3rds original size when found) she proceeded with surgical removal. The surgical margins were clean, but the deep surgical margin was less than 1 mm wide. The microscopic findings were Mast Cell Tumor, Grade III.

    Post op, while the surgical site was healing we discussed the next step. My husband and I did research and decided we wished to try Kinavet. (My husband and I chose Kinavet based on patients’ favorable response to it in Europe where it is in use under a different name.) Our Vet also did internet research on it because she has suggested a different therapy.) Kinavet had not yet been used in our Vet’s practice due to its conditional licensing in the US, but our Vet agreed it was worth a try. By the time the surgical site was healed our dog had developed 2 more tumors. One was on her (L) side and the other was opposite her (R) hock (both aspirated as MCT’s). The one on her side was the size of large marble and the one on her leg was the size of a pea. (I understand that new tumors are considered new incidents and not metastasis.)

    Per Vet when we started the Kinavet daily (per Mfg.’s dosage directions) and the dog’s daily dose of Pred was changed to every other day. (Because our dog had terrible thirst and urination in her sleep due to excessive water drinking my husband did more research and our Vet let us switch her to Methylprednisolone which she tolerates much better.) After our dog was on Kinavet a few weeks the tumors disappeared completely (although there was some in situ hair loss on the leg), but about a month later our dog started to get very sick and was vomiting several times a day. Because of mouth noises she made in her sleep I had already suspected GERD and started her (per Vet) on a daily dose of Prevacid or Prilosec. My husband decided to stop the Kinavet for awhile and 12 days later the two tumors were back and were already their previous size. We restarted the Kinavet and the tumors again disappeared in a few weeks. We are hoping that the fact the Kinavet is acting on those tumors that it is also controlling metastasis from the first tumor. We added an antiemetic – Phenergan / promethazine per vet.

    As soon as we started the dog on Kinavet we had her urine checked and blood work done every 2 weeks. She was doing well enough that we then went to one month, and then last time 2 months although her red blood cell count was marginal on her last blood work (my husband was concerned, our Vet was not). When I say WE I am referring to our dog’s care team, our Vet and us because we truly have been acting as a team. Initially our Vet had us dosing the dog only as directed by Kinavet, but after the last blood work and urine testing she gave us permission to experiment with “holidays”. My husband has chosen 4 days on, one day off, then 5 days on, one day off, then repeat.

    Because the dog has been on Prednisone (and later Methylprednisolone) since late May, and because it did not seem to be extremely effective in shrinking the first tumor, I am questioning whether, based on what happened when the dog was off Kinavet for 12 days and then back on it for a short time (and the tumors disappeared with no further incidence) whether we can risk discontinuing the Methylprednisolone (because I know that “cortisone” is not without its own set of side effects)?

    Thanking you in advance,

    Jeanne

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    HI JEanne. Not easy decision, as well as fact I have no experience with kinavet. Have used a different drug called Palladia in these cases with good results. I personally would probably just stick with kinavet, as I dont think the pred is doing much as per your description and given the grade of the biopsied tumors. I would also consider working with a holistic vet on supportive diet and nutritional supplements that can help strengthen immune system and help lessen long term side effects of these strong drugs. I find an integrative approach works best. To learn more see http://www.doctordym.com Many homeopathic vets do offer phone consultations.

    [Reply]

  38. Patricia
    Posted December 2, 2013 at 8:09 pm | Permalink

    Hi, thank you in advance for answering my question.

    I have a 6 year old cat who is 14 lbs that has been recently diagnosed with asthma. He was given prednisone in a decreasing dosage until he got to 5 mg once a day, which he has been on for a few days now. My vet asked me to check on cost of Flovent from Costco and I learned that it is $180 per month. I just can not afford this since it will be on going for his whole life, per vet. I feel terrible. I know pred. Is not good to stay on and has many side effects. Can you give me other medicines I can ask my vet about that will have no side effects or at least less? Also are there any homeopathic approaches for asthma? His first attack was pretty bad. He never had it before. I had to rush him to emergency vet. x-rays showed he had asthma. He is doing well on this dose and so we are going to lower it again, per vet, but I would like to know what else We can do. I feel terrible that I can’t afford the $180 a month. We have just paid the $700 bill from emergency and follow up vet bills just to control with shots, diagnose with x-rays and provide antibiotics and prednisone. Plus we have a one year old german shepherd who is having a slight itch that we haven’t been able to trace the cause, so we’ve spent another $800 on her many visits and new food as well. i don’t know if these two new problems could be related at all. Thank you for any suggestions you can provide.

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Hi Patricia. Sorry you are having so many expensive health issues with your pets. Regarding the asthma situation, I would ask your vet about the services and equipment available from http://www.aerocat.com which has ways of getting nebulized meds into airways of cats to help cut down on cortisone dose or frequency. Other meds you can ask your vet about include theophylline, as well as terbutaline, which may help some cats. Finally I would work with a homeopathic or holistic vet on an individualized approach to the asthma long term. To learn more about homeopathy go to http://www.beyondflatearth.com as well as my website http://www.doctordym.com Many homeopathic vets like myself do offer phone consultations nationwide, should none be available in your area.

    [Reply]

  39. Leslie
    Posted December 14, 2013 at 1:02 am | Permalink

    My husband and I rescued a 3 month old puppy in September from a kill-shelter in NC. His name is Jax. Around the first of November, Jax, who is normally a very active dog came into the bedroom and laid down and didn’t seem to want to move very much. We figured he was probably playing with the other dogs and was just tired. However, the next day, we noticed his leg start to swell. His leg was huge (over twice the size of his other ones), very hard, and a little red. It was also hot to the touch. He was extremely lethargic, and I knew he was running a fever. Jax was in a lot of pain, screaming when he had to move, and could not use his leg.

    We took him to a vet, who took x-rays of his leg. We thought he had maybe broken his leg, or had a bad sprain. After looking at his x-rays, she showed me he had no breaks, but we could see the swelling around his leg. She warned us about a disease, but said we’d hope for the best and treat it as a bad sprain. Jax was prescribed Clavamox, Rimadyl, and Tramadol.

    We did what we were advised for a couple of days, but Jax wasn’t getting any better. One morning we woke up and he had a lot of fluid hanging from his chest and throat area. We could see and feel all the fluid in him. His leg was still very swollen. We took him back to them same vet, who told us this was the disease she warned us about. She said Jax has Congenital Lymphedema, and that it was rare and there was no treatment. She told us we needed to make a decision by the weekend to put him down. We were devasted. We just got him. We love him. So, we couldn’t take that as our final answer.

    I contacted a very wonderful vet who had treated another one of my rescues for a broken leg. I faxed him the notes from the vet we saw who diagnosed him (who is not our normal vet, we only took him there because it was a Saturday evening and every where else was closed). He advised that Jax may just need some intensive care with powerful antibiotics. He recommended an emergency vet who could watch him 24/7. We took Jax there.

    The vet at the emergency vet disagreed we had to put him down, thank goodness. She prescribed him Enrofloxacin, Minocycline, Clavamox, Prednisone, and Tramadol. We were advised to discontinue use of the Rimadyl.

    After the very first dose, Jax’s leg started going down and within days he was back to normal. We finished all medications as prescribed. He has been off of them for about a week. The day before yesterday, we noticed Jax being hot again, very lethargic, and just not himself. We knew it was coming back. His leg did not swell this time though. I think maybe a little of the infection was left because that shoulder still felt a little warm, and maybe the infection had spread throughout his whole system again like we were told it did the first time (his system was sepsis).

    We took him back to the emergency vet yesterday since they were the ones who helped him before. They refilled his medication, but told us that if this round doesn’t work, and it comes back after he is finished with the medications, we are probably going to have to amputate his leg. Don’t get me wrong, I’d rather have a dog with three legs than no dog at all, but we are hoping for another solution. Also, the first vet told us that amputation was not an option. So I’m wondering, if we amputate his leg, can the lymphedema spread?

    We have been told this is a very rare disorder, with no cure or treatment. Jax has only been on his mediation again for a day now, and he is already back to normal (though he still limps a little, he has since his leg first became swollen).

    Has anyone had any experience with Congenital Lymphedema? We are desparate. All of the vets pretty much our only hope is to contact veterinary medical schools that will have more expertise in the matter. I’ve done this as well, to no avail. No one is conducting clinical trials on this right now, that I have found at least (and I’m doing A LOT of research).

    We were told when we took him back to the vet the other day that Prednisone was the main medication he needed. Can Congenital Lyphedema be controlled with just Prednisone? Why can’t we keep him on the meds that work so well forever? I’m aware that he can become immune to the antibiotics, and I know being on a steroid for an extended period of time can cause side effects (which we are concerned about because he’s so young), but could we keep him on the lowest dose of Prednisone possible every other day for the rest of his life? We just want our baby in our lives. He’s so special. He’s already been through so much in his short life. He was seized as evidence in a high speed car case and came within a day of being killed in a shelter before being rescued by us. We just want to see him grow up and live a long, healthy life.

    If anyone can help, I would truly appreciate it. Thank you!

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    HI Leslie. I am so sorry to hear of your sad story about your beloved puppy Jax. Cases like him are why(after my ivy league education at Penn and Cornell) that I also incorporated holistic healing and homeopathy into my practice. Although I have not personally heard of congenital lymphadema, I presume like most chronic diseases in our pets that it is immune-mediated or autoimmune, and our only conventional allopathic treatment options are steroids or other immune suppressive drugs. When reading your history, as soon as I saw prednisone I knew he would respond. The problem with prednisone and other immune suppressive drugs is that typically one has to keep giving stronger and stronger drugs which have increasingly possible side effects. Thus I recommend working with a holistic veterinarian on diet, supplements and preferably constitutional homeopathy. You should AVOID all vaccinations, and topical and/oral pesticides which can trigger worsening autoimmune disease. This is NOT an antibiotic disease, but as with most other chronic diseases in veterinary medicine, immune mediated., for reasons I wont get into here. To learn more about the exciting option of classical constitutional homeopathic prescribing, see www. beyondflatearth.com as well as my website http://www.doctordym.com Many homeopathic vets like myself do offer phone consultations. Good luck and let me know if I can help further with this tough case.

    [Reply]

  40. Melissa
    Posted January 20, 2014 at 4:32 am | Permalink

    I have a 2 yr old Black Lab/Pyrenees mix dog who has been on Gabapentin for Epilepsy and was prescribed Prednisone for a skin disease. I notice that he has seizures while taking Prednisone. With the Gabapentin by itself he’s ok and has no seizures. What can I do? He takes Gabapentin 300mg 3 times a day and 20mg of prednisone every other day.

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    I would ask for different alternative for skin disease such as atopica or even an antihistamine if appropriate.

    [Reply]

    Melissa Reply:

    I will be sure to do that.

    [Reply]

  41. Shari
    Posted February 16, 2014 at 3:41 pm | Permalink

    can a cat weighing around 8-9 #s take FLOVENT 220mcg for asthma?

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Dose sounds a bit high. Check with 1800petmeds pharmacist Gary.

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    I dont see a problem, but check with 1800petmeds pharamcist

    [Reply]

  42. shawn
    Posted February 20, 2014 at 2:11 pm | Permalink

    last week my 6-1/2 yr. Grate Dane Abby was starting to gag and cough a bit, I felt around her neck and found 2 large glands just under her jaw, about the size of a walnut. we made a visit to the vet and a blood test witch came back normal, the vet then took a biopsy of the glands and lab work came back with cancer, all of Abby’s glands are swell and more then likely cancer is moving into other organs. the vet said 2 choices cancer treatment or prednisone my help extend her life with a litter longer.
    I wanted to ask about how much prednisone a 109 lb dog should take daily and how long should she take steroids, the rest of her life ? my main thoughts are to get the glands swelling down so she can have an ez”re time with breathing. she is eating a bit less then normal, we get exercise and her will and spirit is about 75% I have started her on healthy homemade fresh meals. thanks Shawn.

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Hi Shawn. When used in case like this, cortisone is usually needed for rest of her life. Typical dose for cancer is one half to 1 mg per pound daily. But in her case I would probably start with 25 mg prednisone twice daily. I would continue to do home diets. I would also work with a holistic vet on some other supportive supplements for her. To learn more about holistic medicine go to http://www.doctordym.com Many homeopathic vets do offer phone consultations.

    [Reply]

  43. Joyce Deal
    Posted February 26, 2014 at 11:06 am | Permalink

    Good morning! My 6 year old Boston Terrier has been on a decreasing amount of prednisone for about two weeks. Our vet believes that he has a brain tumor. For awhile, he showed great improvement but, yesterday, he started going in circles again and became lethargic. What other drugs would you recommend for him?
    Thank you

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    HI Joyce. Speak to vet about upping dose of prednisone again. Also consider antioxidant supplements like proanthozone and cell advance or oncosupport from 1800petmeds. I also LOVE the group of supplements called TRansfer Factor. To learn more and to order go to http://www.powerbod.com/2/michaeldym

    [Reply]

  44. Jasper Holt
    Posted March 9, 2014 at 12:31 am | Permalink

    Hi – My 12 month old pup who weighs 9 kilograms has just commenced 10mg prednisone for allergies. She has vomited a couple of times today and is pretty quiet. I’m just wondering if this is the prednisone (only started 2 days ago) and if the dose would be considered too high in a dog of that weight. Also is there any advice on how I should manage her nausea?

    [Reply]

    Savannah Reply:

    I’ve never experienced naseau as a side effect of Prednisone and two of my dogs are on it (one for allergies and one for congenital lymphedema). The one on it for allergies is a rat terrier. He is about 13lbs. I’m not sure what 9kg is in pounds, but I think your dog is on too many MG’s if he’s a small dog. My rat terrier was only prescribed 4mg and he stated off only taking a 1/2 a pill (which is 2mg) and noe he’s done to 1/4 a pill (1mg). Even my other dog that’s on the predisone (he’s a pit bull puppy and weighed about 35lbs when he first got prescribed the medication) was only prescribed 5mg and his condition (congenital lymphedema) is very serious and can be life threatening. You need to contact a vet, preferably a second opinion, but I would decrease his dosage for sure. You have to do thus gradually and in increments with prednisone. I’m not a vet so I’m not giving medical advice, but I do have experience with dogs with medical problems and I believe that 10mg of prednisone is prescribed for dogs with heartworms and very serious conditions not allergies. He also needs to go to the vet if he’s throwing up a lot and you think it’s an adverse reaction to the medication.

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Excellent points. A veterinarian should always be consulted in case like this

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    This dose is sort of on high side. The vomiting could be from prednisone so best to see vet for evaluation and dosage adjustment. Also pepcid AC at dose of one half mg per pound once to twice daily.

    [Reply]

  45. Jennifer Reitmeister
    Posted March 17, 2014 at 9:30 am | Permalink

    Hi, my 17 year old dachshund has had a long 5 week bout with chonic pancreatitis (no vomitting) which was diagnosed via ultra sound and blood work. The worst symptom was horrible diarrhea of the large colon. Metronidazole made it worse, and tylan powder didn’t seem to help. This entire time he went from a dog with a piggy appetite to no appetite at all. I started seeing an internist and as a last resort, he put him on a short term (hopefully) dose of prednisone. In three days the diarrhea has stopped and he is starting to eat a little. My concern is that the pred will make the pancreatitis worse. The internist felt that if it was going to do that immediately, it would have by now (fourth day). I just wondered what your thoughts were about prednisone and pancreatitis? I am not sure I have a choice about the pred as nothing else worked. My vet said it we will taper off as quickly as we can. Does this seem safe to you? I would very much appreciate hearing your comments. Thank you so very much.

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Unfortunately when we as traditional vets cant solve diarrhea/pancreatitis cases with tylan, metronidazole, etc we then go to prednisone as we really dont have anything else in our tool chest. I think short term use is ok, but I would consult with a holistic vet on more long term support for pancreatitis in terms of diet, supplements, and possibly homeopathy. To learn more go to my website http://www.doctordym.com Many homeopathic vets do offer phone consultations.

    [Reply]

  46. Nancy A
    Posted March 25, 2014 at 5:41 pm | Permalink

    Hi, we have a 6 or 7 year old Lab/Sharpei mix (Hooch) who weighs about 70 lbs, and has been diagnosed with flea allergies, even though he has no fleas. We recently moved to a new home with Bahia grass, and he loves to lay in it. His original vet put him on Benadryl first, then Zyrtec when the Benadryl stopped working. He had an ACL tear repaired last year, and has been on Meloxicam since then for the arthritis in both knees. The vet we’re seeing now wants Hooch off the Meloxicam for 7 days before she will prescribe any Prednisone for him. He’s scratching and chewing himself up something awful, and we still have 3 more days before we can get him any Pred. Since OTC allergy meds have stopped working, do you know of anything we can do for Hooch to relieve his itching? I’ve started cooking him meals, to rule out a grain allergy, and have been putting a 400IU dose of Vitamin E in his meals to help.
    Thanks in advance.

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    I personally dont wait one week between stopping metacam and starting pred. In my opinion 3 or 4 days is fine. In meantime you can try other antihistamines like chlorphenirimine at dose of 8 mg twice daily, as well as yucca intensive and proanthozone from 1800petmeds as supplements also which may help.

    [Reply]

  47. Stacy L.
    Posted March 30, 2014 at 3:29 pm | Permalink

    Three years ago my now-15 YO schnauzer/staffie mix was diagnosed with chronic pancreatitis. Our vet put her on 2 MG of Medrol every other day (he said for the inflammation), and we put her on a prescription lowfat kibble. In the last few months, I’ve come to find that there isn’t a single piece of documented evidence that steroids help at all with pancreatitis.

    Over the last three years her amylase and lipase levels have continued to get worse (despite the Medrol) and topped out last November at 2344 and 3231, respectively. At that point, my vet recommended putting her on Atopica, as he said they were considering it as a possible treatment for chronic pancreatitis…he went to Texas A&M vet school, BTW. I said no way, that we weren’t using my old dog as a guinea pig.

    Two days after this I started giving her Mercola’s digestive enzymes for dogs with her kibble and a month ago, her amylase and lipase levels had plummeted to 644 and 1023. Amylase is now in normal range, lipase is still high, but much better. My vet (of course) is skeptical the enzymes had anything to do with it, and I asked him if we could wean Daisy off the Medrol…especially since her liver enzymes continue to get worse (latest ALP level was 845). Over the years he has said that her liver enzyme levels would always be high because of the steroids, but they’ve slowly been increasing. Well, knowing what I know now, I want to get her off the steroids. I fear she never needed to be on them in the first place, and that they’ve done her liver more harm than good.

    About a month ago, I started Daisy on milk thistle twice a day, hoping to perhaps help support any liver problems. My vet agreed to reduce her Medrol to 2 MG every 3 days and then we’ll re-run her labs in a couple more weeks and see what everything looks like

    I guess I’m wondering what point there is to her being on a low-dose of Medrol for pancreatitis? Like I said, I haven’t seen a bit of evidence anywhere (and I’m an internet research nut), and I’ve

    Also, we got her off the prescription kibble because I felt it was too low in protein and made her GI system work too hard. We now have her on a still-low fat kibble, but one with higher protein.

    Other than the pancreatitis (from which she’s been completely symptom free for 3 years), she’s on thyroid meds and benazepril for protein in her urine. She’s in fantastic shape…can still see, still hear, walks a mile a day and plays with her younger sister. Two bouts of idiopathic canine vestibular syndrome last summer, and she’s recovered fully from that…except she lost most of her back leg muscle strength so no more jumping.

    Any feedback or insight would be appreciated…thanks!

    [Reply]

    Stacy L. Reply:

    Oh, and I do understand she’s 15 1/2 and that our time with her is limited. I just don’t want to be hastening the end of her life by having her on unnecessary (and possibly harmful) drugs.

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Hi Stacy. I do appreciate your wonderful thought out letter, as well as your smart questions. Causes and treatment of pancreatitis from a conventional medical model has always remained controversial and not truly known. Steroids have fallen in and out of vogue over the years, and recently are in again, but as you say, no real data on efficacy. I think the enzymes are a great idea, as well as perhaps working with a holistic veterinarian on other nutritional and dietary support based on your animal’s own individual constitutional symptoms. Dietary therapy off of the kibble may be worthwhile as well. Many holistic veterinarians like myself offer phone consultations nationwide. To learn more go to http://www.doctordym.com You have done a great job in getting your pet to this point. Hopefully she can continue on for years to come!!!

    [Reply]

  48. Sara Sunland
    Posted April 10, 2014 at 11:03 am | Permalink

    Hi Dr, Dym,

    Our dog has melanoma that has as spread to her lungs. We had changed her diet to home cooked meals and added a bunch of supplements and Chinese herbs per her holistic vet. She developed a distaste for her food and stopped eating (her stomach was also gurgling and she was gaseous) so we eliminated all the supplements and herbs to try and get her to eat again. She didn’t, so we turned to our vet who put her on a low dose (10mg) of pred (she was 80 lbs but is now 72 lbs) and metoclopramide to try and help stimulate her appetite. At first she ate a decent amount of food but now she is getting pickier and pickier and eating less and less. It is a battle to keep looking for new foods that she likes at first then looses interest in them. Our holistic vet said there is nothing in her ‘toolbox’ to help. So would it be alright to up her dosage of pred or is there something else that might be better? She has been on the pred and me to for about 2 weeks. She is only 8.5 years old and is still in good spirits and seems to be happy, so we hate to put her to sleep. Any suggestions please? Thank you for all you do!

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    There is great appetite stimulant now being used in vet medicine called Mirtazipine at dose of 7.5 to 15 mg once daily which may help appetite. Also consider holistic supplement like Maitake DMG which you can get on line as well as transfer factor. to learn more about latter, go to http://www.powerbod.com/2/michaeldym to learn more.

    [Reply]

  49. Erika
    Posted April 18, 2014 at 3:10 pm | Permalink

    Hello! I have a 13 year old 18 pound dachshund that recently has had breathing issues and a high resp. rate. She has had x-rays, an ultra sound of her lungs and heart, and can’t find anything definite wrong with her except that she has inflammation and her lungs are not \the prettiest\ from what I was told. No tumors, no high blood pressure, no blood clots, etc. The vet put her on prednisone(the pills) and i’m trying to wean her down to the lowest dose possible but it seems like her comfort dose is 2.5 mg in the am and 2.5 mg in the pm so that’s 5 mg a day! Is that too much long term do you think? Any feed back/advice is greatly appreciated. Prissy’s mom

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    HI Erika. Every animal is an individual so dose of pred will vary. Try and get her on lowest dose possible. Also consider working with a holistic vet like myself who will incorporate other supplements and/or modalities which may help in this situation. For example supplements like turmeric, as well as grape seed extract, vitamin C and many others can help with allergic airway inflammation. Good luck and let me know if I can help further.

    [Reply]

  50. Joel
    Posted May 11, 2014 at 3:28 pm | Permalink

    Hi, our nearly-7-yr-old miniature poodle is a long-term user of prednisone in the form of Temaril-P. He’s been taking this for 3-4 years for severe allergies. (He also has several other medical issues explained below.)
    He is allergic to dust mites and 3 types of molds, and we’ve tried everything – prescription diets, immunotherapy shots prepared by a veterinary allergy specialist, Atopica, fatty acid supplements, etc. The only thing that works is Temaril-P and the lowest effective dose is one tablet twice daily.
    He also has torn CCL’s in both hind knees – one has been surgically repaired and the other not. Recently he re-injured the one that had been repaired. He’s been taking Tramadol 50 mg twice daily for the pain, and after the re-injury, the vet added Novox too, at 25 mg twice daily.
    The problem is he can’t take Temaril-P with Novox, so the vet switched the Temaril-P to Apoquel. At first we tried 5.4 mg of Apoquel twice daily, and it worked great for the allergies, but after a few days he started vomiting about once per day. The vet cut the Apoquel back to once daily, and after a few days the vomiting stopped but the itching came back in full force. A week ago the vet upped the Apoquel to 8.1 mg/day (1 pill in the morning and a half-pill in the evening). No vomiting yet, but still itching like crazy.
    I know long term Temaril-P use is bad for many reasons, and doesn’t help heal his knees. But it is still the only thing that seems to make his allergies comfortable. Surgery is unlikely, since the first one didn’t hold and because besides the two torn CCL’s he also has bladder stones that ideally should be removed. We can’t afford 3 more surgeries nor do we want to put him through the pain and recovery of 3 surgeries, but we want to keep him as comfortable as possible.
    Any suggestions?
    (I should mention that he also takes Zonisamide 100 mg twice daily for seizures which are completely under control with the medicine.)

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Sounds like a conventional medicine mess. Sounds like low dose temaril p is your best option for most things, including joint issues, skin issues, etc. I would go with that over the novox. I would make sure to use plenty of nutritional supplements to support healing like my favorite transfer factor, which you can learn more about at http://www.powerbod.com/2/michaeldym Also consider supplements like proanthozone and yucca intensive from 1800petmeds. I would also consider working with a homeopathic veterinarian for individualized long term holistic support as well. To learn more see http://www.drpitcairn.com as well as my website http://www.doctordym.com Many offer phone consultations. Dog gone pain is natural pain medicine you can also learn more about on line

    [Reply]

  51. Posted May 14, 2014 at 2:54 pm | Permalink

    Dr. Dym’
    We have a five year old female Gordon Setter who became very ill last October. We were preparing to show her in a show in New Mexico and then travel to Colorado to visit family. Two days before leaving for the meet/journey, we took her to our vet for a checkup and a Bordetella vaccine, which she had a year before. The vaccine was not the injection or the nasal, but an oral. The very next morning, we noticed that she was limping. We took her immediately to the vet, he was somewhat suspicious of f the vaccine, thought about administering a steroid injection and subsequently decided to place her on Rimady. He also ran a blood panel, nothing seem to show up. We scratched her from the show, but continued with our plans to Colorado. During the week in Co. we noted she was still limping and having some difficulty in getting in the car, jumping, etc., but the Rimadyl seemed to be handling her pain. After a week we returned to Az., and took her into the vet that Monday when the limping became more prominent and was affecting other limbs. The doctor put her on Prednisone. We weaned her off the Rimadyl for 36 hours before beginning the Prednisone. After the first dose of Prednisone, she appeared to be improved for, at most 12 hrs.. By the next morning, she was in extreme pain, joints were swollen, we had to carry her outside and to the vet’s office. She was running a temperature (105 F.), extremely lethargic, inappetant and could barely walk. He took x-rays that indicated mild right stifle effusion and severe right periarticular sot tissue selling. There was also generalized lymphadenopathy. He also performed a fine needle aspiration and cytology of the popliteal l.n. which were consistent with a reactive lymph node. CBC/chem and Cocci titers were performed on 10/24/13 and were unremarkable. Her last heat cycle ended in early October shortly before the vaccination . At this point, he had us go to the emergency vet hospital for treatment, as she had become that critical. The specialist at the hospital asked us if we had been back east at all (so did our regular vet) which we had not, but we did tell her that we had been to Colorado and Texas in June and July. We never saw any evidence of ticks and it had been several months since our trips to Co. and Tx. Neither vet thought it probably would not be Lyme Disease or Rocky Mountain Spotted Tick Fever. Our girl spent two days/nights in intensive care, with I.V.’s administering fluids and medication. A CT scan confirmed physical exam findings of no masses or bony changes and no apparent structural cause of the limb swellings. Their diagnosis was a suspect systemic disease causing inflammation and leaky blood vessels. They stated the causes of inflammation include immune-mediated diseases ( ie: immune-mediated polyarthritis, infectious diseases (ie: disseminated salmonellosis, tick-borne diseases), or delayed anaphylaxis, such as from a drug or vaccine (ie: Type III hypersensitivity). She was sent home with a fentanyl patch and tramadol for pain, Doxycycline and Augmentin and Pentoxifylline. They also recommended we have joint taps with cytology and cultures and submitting a lymph node aspirate, which we did with our regular vet. We also approved for a titer on tick-born disease, which all came back unremarkable. We had to force feed her for two-three months, along with all the recommended medication. She needed s sling for a least a month to walk and relieve herself. Because we were so desperate in that the doctor’s could not give us a definitive diagnosis for her mysterious illness, we consulted with her breeders (Wisconsin) and with other breeders here about her case. We also purchased a detoxifier, immunostim’r and yucca intensive and a Multi vitamin from Azmira Holistic Animal Care products, but ceased these when a homeopathic/reg. vet suggested we abstain from these because of the alcohol in them and wait until she is greatly improved and off of all her meds. The holistic vet suggested we give her vitamin B-12 and thuja occidentalis as well. Currently, she is much improved and is on 10mg. of prednisone every other day. She also gets the vitamins. Our regular vet has warned us that when she finishes this last dose of the 10mg. for the month of May, her symptoms could return, in which case it would be back on prednisone. Since being on the steroid, she is continually thirsty, hungry, drools, has lost a lot of her coat and has put on over ten pounds. She still has some difficulty jumping, running and does not have a lot of energy. We panic every time she seems to limp a bit. Our regular vet suggests to spay her when the meds are finished. Before she became ill, she was earning her points toward a championship. Now, first and foremost, we are concerned about the long term effects of the Prednisone and will she ever recover enough to be shown again. Do you think the tick-born disease titer was negative because it was done after the treatment and what is your opinion as to whether the cause was the vaccine or the tick disease? What would you suggest about future vaccinations, heartworm and other parasitic disease medications, spaying and any other suggestions for her long term health. We have never had a dog so young have such a puzzling and heart-wrenching illness. Any insights and suggestions would be much appreciated. Thank you for your time and all that you do for animals.

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Hi Marelyn: Sorry to hear about your tragic story. To summarize, as a homeopathic veterinarian, who also gets calls/referrals from around the country, I can honestly say it was the bordatella vaccination which triggered this immune mediated mystery illness. Vaccinations are involved with more suffering and disease in animals than I can share here. I would be happy to advise you more individually going hear forward. I would love a copy of this letter, if you could send it to my private email, as I would like to share this with colleagues and other animal guardians. My email is michael@doctordym.com Also to learn more about my own individual homeopathic practice, and how my practice works, etc(as I advise many clients on issues like this, go to http://www.doctordym.com

    [Reply]

  52. Jan
    Posted May 19, 2014 at 11:14 pm | Permalink

    Hi Dr. Dym,
    Our 5 year old Westie was diagnosed with IBD last July at UC Davis. (blood, Endo, Ultrasound tests completed) She was initially on 10 mg then tapered to 5 mg daily of Prednisone for the past year and we have been feeding her Royal Canin Hypoallergenic Potato Whitefish diet only. The problem that we are having is that she becomes very depressed on the 5 mg and higher and never wags her tail and doesn’t want to play, she just sleeps and hides. When we taper her down below the 5 mg her IBD symptoms start returning. My question is would Budesonide be a better medication for her with less side effects? Are there any other alternative medications including Natural/Herbal medications that might help? Also, shouldn’t a dog with IBD have their diets periodically changed?
    Thank you,
    Jan

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Hi Jan. All great questions. As a more holistic oriented veterinarian, I certainly do believe that diets should be varied in dogs, even with IBD, as feeding same food over and over usually eventually leads of food allergies or hypersensitivities in animals due to leaky gut of inflammatory bowel disease. I would first try and get her healthier. through nutritional supplementation or even constitutional classical homeopathy as an alternative. Certainly Budesonide is another option, but it is still a steroid, and sometimes may not work as well. I would learn more about constitutional classical homeopathy as an option. To learn more go to http://www.beyondflatearth.com and check out booklet. Also see info on my website http://www.doctordym.com Many homeopathic vets offer phone consultations, as do I nationwide. I would explore all of these, as otherwise a life time of pred, etc is ahead.

    [Reply]

  53. Jones
    Posted May 28, 2014 at 8:39 pm | Permalink

    Hi Dr.
    This past week my 10yr old female lab had surgery for a lump that was diagnosed as a mast cell, stage 2, low grade tumor. My vet said that giving her Benadryl and Pepcid may control the growth and stop the tumor from traveling to other organs. She has several other smaller lumps and I was wondering what if anything would be best to make her comfortable and give her quality of life for the rest of her years. I am on a low income budge but I have read about the new drug Palladia, would that be best and how expensive is this possible wonder drug? Any advice would be very welcome. Thank you.

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Palladia is excellent drug, but yes is very expensive. You could also try the supplement transfer factor, as well as oncosupport from 1800petmeds. To learn more about transfer factor and to order, go to http://www.powerbod.com/2/michaeldym

    [Reply]

  54. Mario
    Posted May 28, 2014 at 10:36 pm | Permalink

    Hello, our little guy (14 1/2 yr old ,11 lb shih tzu) Frankie was diagnosed with chf back in oct of last year. Coughing,and collapsing a lot. Vet put him on lasix and encard and he has been doing ” fine” No more coughing or collapsing . He has had a history of spinal problems all his life weak back legs to almost paralyzed at times. He has been able to get thru these bouts with steroid shots and pills on and off. Well now it seems he’s having some weakness and trembling of back legs and walking very slow like it’s his back again. Can he still get the steroid and not harm him because of the chf? I’ve been reading that steroids are not good for dogs in chf, but I don’t think we have a choice? Thanks for any info, really want to help Frankie stay comfortable . Mario

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    HI Mario. Also consider supplements like glycoflex II from 1800petmeds, as well as antioxidants proanthozone which can help with inflammation. I also LOVE the supplement Dev Cor Mobility which you can find on line

    [Reply]

  55. Mario
    Posted May 30, 2014 at 8:48 pm | Permalink

    Well, I had to bring Frankie to the vet because his back was getting worse. Vet decided , the best for his pain was a shot of dexamethazone followed next 3 days pills .5mg , 2x daily then 1 for 5 days, then 1/2 every other day. He also stopped the lasix at this time and continued the enapiril . One day later, he’s running around like a puppy. I’m just concerned the chf will get worse without the lasix , but vet says let’s watch and see. So, what do you think? Thanks Mario

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    The short term dexamethasone should not be a problem. I would go with what your vet is suggesting for CHF management. I would also consult with a holistic vet on supplement support, etc for back and heart.

    [Reply]

  56. Mario
    Posted May 30, 2014 at 8:57 pm | Permalink

    Sorry, forgot to say that Frankie also seems to be having soon bowl problems – loose stool. I cook all his food , low fat beef or chicken with brown rice to minimize his salt intake ,any ideas? Also read dexamethazone retains salt, oh boy! Thanks again!

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    I Would refer you to my friend and nutritionist Loreen Playford for more specific recipes/advice on diet. See her website http://www.k9petchef.com

    [Reply]

  57. Kate
    Posted June 2, 2014 at 9:39 pm | Permalink

    We have a 4 year old 7 pound Maltese who was diagnosed with an autoimmune disease in January. He was on 5mg Prednisone a day with instructions to cut the dose in 1/2 after 30 days and then stop the medication. In February we cut the dose in 1/2 and he was doing fine until we stopped. At that point he started vomiting, refused to eat and began shaking a lot . We took him to our vet who said we must have misunderstood his instructions and we would have to start all over again with the 5mg per day for 30 days and then cut that in half in 30 and in half again in 30 etc until he was off. After 30 days we cut the dose in 1/2 and within 3 days he was shaking violently and throwing up. We put him back on the full dose and he was fine except the shaking continued but not as bad. We tried to cut it in 1/2 again about two weeks later and he was fine for 8 days and then couldn’t keep food down, became lethargic and shaking badly again. Called the vet and he said to do 1/2 in the morning and 1/2 at night for 2 weeks (back to full dose) and then do 1/2 in the morning and 1/4 at night and so on. The problem now is that he has not gotten any better after 3 days of being back on full dose. We are retired and on a fixed income and I cannot afford to continue taking him to the vet every month so they can guess what to do next. Anyone have a situation like this that was fixed?

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Really need more accurate diagnosis than just “autoimmune disease” here as there are some immune mediated diseases that need life long and/or other immune suppressive therapy with drugs like aziothioprine and/or atopica at same time as pred. I would ask your vet for referral to vet internist in your area for accurate diagnosis so that long term plan, possibly incorporating these drugs is indicated

    [Reply]

  58. Posted June 4, 2014 at 7:36 pm | Permalink

    Thanks doc but we had to put Frankie to sleep today. Devastated Unbelievable grief. That little guy depended on me for everything. Crying like a baby

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Sorry for your loss.

    [Reply]

  59. Jan
    Posted June 5, 2014 at 12:22 am | Permalink

    Hi Dr. Dym–
    My nearly 13-year-old GSD mix suddenly presented with ataxia and loss of sensation in her back end in November, and her orthopedist initially suspected a spinal stroke or DM and prescribed 40 mg of pred daily, to be tapered down over the course of three weeks. When things didn’t improve quickly, we visited a neurologist, had an MRI of her brain and spine done, drew CSF, ran extensive blood and PARR tests and ran the DNA test for DM (she tested as a carrier but did not test at risk), but none of these tests gave us any definitive answers. The neurologist thought it might be leukemia in the brain and suggested chemo; a brain cancer specialist who reviewed her films strongly disagreed and felt it was more likely degenerative disk disease. We tapered the pred down to 10 mg daily (she weighs 90 pounds), and for lack of a better option, have kept her on it ever since, as no one seems able to give us a definitive answer or other treatment suggestions. She is still mobile, though has more trouble than she did prior to all of this (can’t do steps, has some trouble getting up from a sitting position, and has occasional fecal incontinence), and when I tried taking her off the pred, her mobility worsened, so I’ve kept her on the 10 mg daily. We do electroacupuncture, I supplement her meals with home cooked human-grade beef, chicken, broccoli and blueberries, and she is on a host of anti-inflammatory supplements (Alenza, Glyo-Flex III, turmeric/curcumin, ginger, NAC, salmon oil, SAMe, IP6/Inositol, milk thistle, green tea extract). People have suggested I try adding DGP, but am uncertain if this conflicts with prednisone since it has Fever Few extract as one of the ingredients. Can you tell me if this would be problematic? Also, should I be concerned about the fact that she’s now been on prednisone for 6+ months? Are there other, safer alternatives I should be looking at? I honestly am not sure whether I’m treating cancer, degenerative disk disease, arthritis or even DM, so I’m looking to go with anti-inflammatory options that keep her mobile for as long as possible. Thanks so much for any suggestions you can offer!

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    I dont think DGP would be a problem with low dose pred but check with DGP company. Sounds like you are doing alot for your dog. Consider Stephen Blake’s gemmotherapies like mountain pine, common birch, wild woodvine and black currant Learn more about these on line

    [Reply]

    Caroline Snyder in W Reply:

    Have you tried daily supplements of Methylcobalamin.. Methyl B12? I would suggest 1000 mcg daily (make sure there are no “nasty” ingredients such as Xylitol). The Methyl form of B12 is needed to cross the blood-brain barrier and sometimes humans.. and dogs and cats.. are unable to convert the Cyano form into the form needed by the brain and spinal cord. I have seen complete hind end paralysis and incontinence reversed in dogs using this supplement.

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Thanks for sharing.

    [Reply]

  60. Amy
    Posted June 18, 2014 at 1:39 pm | Permalink

    I recently found blood in my 11yr old bulldog’s urine. I’ve scheduled a vet appointment for Friday, but in the meantime, do I continue to give her prednisone? She’s been on it most of her life. It’s the only thing that keeps her comfortable.

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    I would continue meds until you have your vet check

    [Reply]

  61. Becky
    Posted June 20, 2014 at 8:51 am | Permalink

    I have a 14yr old cat who has IBD, feline herpes, skin allergies, FLUDT(he had the PU surgery), and was told he also has some sort of inflammatory respiratory condition that was minor(this was diagnosed when he had his PU surgery and we were told that keeping his weight down would help) All are under control with diet supplements and prednisone except the IBD which still flares occasionally. Flares are minor and usually resolve in a day or so with a little extra pred.

    He is also taking a probiotic(primal defense) and moducare(plant sterols and sterolins) He gets his probiotic in the morning and moducare in the evening and prednisone every other evening.

    He is on all wet food. I give him very low carb low fat foods like shredded chicken and supplement with pumpkin which seems to help the IBD. We switched several years ago from dry food and a prescription diet for his IBD because this was making his FLUTD flare(blood in the urine) and also because it was causing weight gain(he was up to 16lbs) He has gradually lost weight over about 3 years and is currently about 10 lbs which looks to be about an ideal weight for his size.

    I will mention that we did have him on metronidazole for quite some time but I suspected this was not helping and may have actually given him some diarrhea so we did a trial of stopping it a couple months ago and I noticed no difference and slools seems firmer so we discontinued it.

    I am thinking about trying milk thistle to see if that helps with the IBD flares. What dose would be appropriate for a 10 lb cat? should I give in the morning, evening, split the dose or give it every other day? I have also heard things about SAMe. Do you think either of these would help stabilize my cat? If yes, would you suggest I start both or one at a time. And I would need to know dosing for SAMe too.

    Also about the dosage of pred. We have tried to stop it and symptoms always return so after several years I am thinking that may not be possible. I have gotten him down to 1.25mg every other evening and he will do ok for awhile on that and then something stressful happens and he has a flare up. I am wondering if I should just keep him on a little higher dose or pred and maybe he would not be having the flare ups. What are your thoughts on dosage for every other day pred? I tend to be fearful of keeping him on the pred, but maybe I am doing more harm than good by continuing to reduce it? Honestly he has been so sick so many times that I must be doing something right since he has made it to 14.

    Summer seems like a rough time for him for some reason so I am hoping to find something to keep him feeling better more of the time.

    Thank you

    Becky

    [Reply]

    Becky Reply:

    I wanted to add that his symptoms are throwing up and then not wanting to eat or just picking at his food. Hairballs are sometimes what comes up with liquid then he just seems to not feel good for awhile. When he feels good he has a ravenous appetite. We feed him 3 times a day as the frequent feeds seem to help.

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Sounds like he may be having flareups of IBD or pancreatitis. Try asking vet about prescription drugs cerenia and mirtazipine which can help with nausea/vomiting, appetite, etc

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Mirtazipine very 3 days and/or cerenia can help with appetite stimulation and/or occasional nausea

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    When allergens are highest in stomach, I recommend not too many courses of cortisone shots, so may want to try low/maintenance dose of prednisione Also see my friend and canine nutrionist Loreen Playford, who can help with home made diets http://www.loreenplayford. Good luck with his care and let me know if I can help further.

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Excellent questions. Lowest effective dose of pred to control signs always best. 1.25 mg every other day not bad. I would just increase during flareups as higher doses of pred more likely to cause diabetes, infections, etc. As for Milk thistle I find 50 to 100 mg daily fine. SAMe also good. Product called denamarin from 1800petmeds has both. Also start her on DMG liquid from 1800petmeds. Consider whole food supplements like feline enteric support from standard process which you can find on line Good luck in difficult case.

    [Reply]

  62. Kyle
    Posted June 25, 2014 at 11:23 pm | Permalink

    My cat has lymphoma of the kidneys but has been in remission. She has been on 5 mg of Prednisolone daily. Today I accidentally gave her 0.5 mg of Budesonide. She is showing no distress. Is it safe for me to give her her Prednisolone dose tonight or should I wait till tomorrow? Thank you.

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    I would wait until next day to give pred

    [Reply]

    Kyle Reply:

    Is there any long term harm in giving both at the same time one time?

    [Reply]

    Joe Reply:

    Yeah, what are the dangers of giving both?

  63. Elaine
    Posted June 26, 2014 at 12:39 pm | Permalink

    I have an 11 lb chi/rat terrier who is 1 1/2 yrs old with a spinal injury. I adopted her at 4 mos from a rescue org who had pulled her from a kill shelter in GA. 5 mos ago, she injured herself playing with one of her (my) cats later on in the evenin. She screamed in pain and couldn’t walk. I gave her half an enteric aspirin that night and again the next morning, and took her to the ER clinic, they said spinal injury after xrays, but not new, an exacerbation of a pre-existing issue. They gave her tramadol, and recommended surgery. She recovered pretty quickly and was mobile a few days later. A month later she re-injured herself by running, sliding into a door, and stiffened right up and was paralyzed in her rear legs the next day, brought her to an Orthopedist who suggested a Neurological Surgeon, the surgeon said treat with meds, gave her a shot of Dexamethasone and put her on prednisone and Gabapentin and valium. After a few doses of the Gabapentin, she seemed disoriented so I replaced it with Traumeel and Neuralgia (by Heel) and also replaced the valium with Neurexan, she regained mobility in a few days but it took longer to resolve. She was on a tapering dose of pred for a few weeks and I noticed her rear knees seemed wobbly, so I stopped the pred and brought her to my Chiropractor. After a few adjustments she was much better and was more stable for a couple of weeks.. This past week she fell off the front seat of my car as I made a U turn even with a harness and seatbelt (she had just stood up as I turned) and re-injured herself. I gave her 3 doses of Gabapentin over the next two days and again, she seemed disoriented, so I switched to tramadol. I called and The Neuro Vet said to put her back on the pred for a few days to see if she gets better with that. I also have given her a couple of (1 ml) syringes of Serrapeptase to address the inflammation. It seems to help a great deal. (sorry for the length) and gave more Traumeel and Neuralgia. I am torn between asking for NSAIDs and using the pred again. I have another appt tom with the Chiro which she responds well to. My concern is her youth and using the prednisone again vs an NSAID. They both have long term side effects and she’s so young. Based on your experience, what would you suggest?

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Based on your detailed history, I would go with the pred in this situation, given the amount of neuro episodes she has had. I dont think NSAIDs strong enough. Consider finding holistic vet in your area skilled in acupuncture/chinese herbs and/or ask your chiropractor for referral. OR you can look at referral list on http://www.AHVMA.org

    [Reply]

    Ealine Reply:

    Thank you for your response, have started her on the pred and already see a big improvement after just two doses. I have been unable to get to the Holistic Vet for Accupuncture due to distance, work sched, cost per visit (85 + visit fee) so am relying on Chiro. I truly appreciate your help with my decision. (and am a big fan of Anitra’s for many years, remember your input in that book!) Thank you so much!

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    You are very welcome. Hope things continue to improve.

  64. Elaine
    Posted June 26, 2014 at 12:43 pm | Permalink

    sorry, left out did not have the surgery, for many reasons. Want to avoid if at all possible.

    [Reply]

  65. Marika Zongor
    Posted June 27, 2014 at 12:09 am | Permalink

    Our 12 yr. old Siberian Husky, Cayenne, has been diagnosed with Idiopathic thrombocytopenia – bleeding, bruising and now determined to be an autoimmune disorder by trying to reduce prednisone when her platelets crashed again. We’ll be trying azathioprine to attempt again to get her off the pred in a couple of weeks “IF all goes well,” but I understand that can bring new problem of white blood cell deficiency. I lost two of my dogs unexpectedly last year – they were my heart and soul, also seniors – and I need to do everything I can for her for my sanity. How can I best support her through this forced Cushing’s, and is there any hope or are we just grasping at straws? She has all the typical symptoms: panting, has increased thirst and hunger, and edginess [she already had a very rough start in life (found abandoned, chained to a radiator with no food or water - heard howling by a neighbor who reported the situation to the SPCA, whom we had to fight to get her) and has always been a problem child with resource guarding, constantly challenging the natural alpha in our pack, etc.]. Melatonin, folate and vitamin E have been recommended – should/can I use Rescue Remedy to calm her, and hawthorn, echinacea, CoQ10 to boost her immune system – our vet says no for chlorella, the concern being that her system is already hyper-stimulated, but that the other supplements I researched “are all probably OK.” Oh, we had already been feeding a homemade diet made of lots of safe veggies (kale, spinach, carrots, etc.) and allowable fruit, chicken breast, lentils and chick peas with bone meal; this was in response to sporadically becoming disinterested in “high-end” kibble. Thank you for your availability to all of us, and for your obvious care and concern.

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    HI Marika. I would ask your vet about drug like atopica or cyclosporine instead of aziothioprine or along with that, as I have had good results with that. As for supplements, I think all of them including melatonin are fine. You may also want to consider working with a holistic vet as well individually over the phone or in person if one in your area. I also love the supplement called Transfer factor. To learn more about that supplement, go to the website http://www.powerbod.com/2/michaeldym

    [Reply]

  66. Amy
    Posted June 29, 2014 at 9:27 am | Permalink

    Hi Dr. Dym,

    I have a 3 year old Cavachon. He only weighs 24 pounds. He has severe allergies. He is on a diet of sweet potatoes and salmon only. He also has not been diagnosed with Irritable Bowel Syndrome but I believe he has that or something along those lines. He has been on Metrinidazole and Cerenia without much success. When we put him on prednisone he did much better. We were able to get him down to 1/2 of a 25mg tablet every 3 days and he seemed to be doing fine. We took him off the prednisone about a month ago and I am seeing his problems coming back. He might need to be on the prednisone long term as a result. With that small of a dosage, do you think the side effects will be minimal?

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    HI Amy. Some dogs do need low dose prednisone every few days to maintain remission of immune mediated bowel disease like inflammatory bowel disease. If I am reading you correctly 1/2 of a 25 mg tablet would be quite a high dose. Perhaps you mean 1/2 of a 5 mg tablet? That is a much lower and more appropriate long term dose. Also consider working with holistic vet on dietary an nutritional therapies, as well as possible homeopathy which is an option as well. To learn more about homeopathy, go to my website and the links http://www.doctordym.com

    [Reply]

  67. Vanessa
    Posted June 29, 2014 at 5:50 pm | Permalink

    Hi
    We have an 11 y/o maine coon cat who over the last few months has recently started scratching and scratching. Weve done everything from put him onto a hypo allergenic grain free diet to deflea him, blood test him (came back inconclusive) etc etc. He was on prednisone for about 3 months which worked well. The first week he was on one 5mg tablet per day. Then 1/2 5mg tablet per day then eventually we managed to get the scratching under control with 1/2 5mg tablet every other day. However he would still scratch slightly on 1/2 every other day it wasnt excessive. The scratching would only ever stop completely if he was on one full 5mg tablet per day – which is not good long term.
    We have now moved him onto Atopica and he is still scratching and scratching – even drawing blood. I’m at a loss on what to do? Please any suggestions would be helpful. Do you think 1/2 5mg tablet every other day is ok long term or would you recommend to stick with the Atopica??
    Thanks

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Low dose pred every other day is usually fine in most cats long term although periodic blood work can help to monitor liver,kidneys and pancreas. Also consider working with homeopathic vet for different approach here, as well as even trying home made diet like those in book The NAtural Cat By Anitra Frazier. Learn more about homeopathy on my website http://www.doctordym.com Many homeopathic vets do offer phone consultations

    [Reply]

    Vanessa Reply:

    Great, thank you

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    you are welcome

  68. Amy
    Posted June 29, 2014 at 8:26 pm | Permalink

    Thank you so much Dr. Dym. Yes that was a typo he is not on that high of a dosage. It is 1/2 of 5mg once every three days. Thank you for the info about your website I will definitely check it out. Thanks Amy

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    You are very welcome Amy

    [Reply]

  69. Pat
    Posted June 29, 2014 at 11:02 pm | Permalink

    Hello
    I have a 8 years female sheltie who lost her right front leg at few months old. She been doing great. Few years i bought her a doggy wheelchair to help her to keep up with my other dogs when going to walks. Last year my vet said her front leg was getting very bad inflamation but recently shes been tripping and falling lots .. Shes an happy dog but i can tell she is in pain ..
    We don’t want to sent her to doggy heaven unless thats is the best for her . But what can we do to help her without extending her pain and suffering..

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Put her on great supplements like super joint enhancer and proanthozone from 1800petmeds. Also consider yucca intensive by azmira from 1800petmeds, as well as something called Dog gone pain which you can find on line

    [Reply]

  70. L Ellis
    Posted July 2, 2014 at 6:22 am | Permalink

    Hi,

    My 2 year old staffie has some kind of allergy but we do not know what it is. If she is not on the tablets she scratches her eyes and under legs constantly. She is bald behind her ears and constantly loses hair on her chest and belly. She has been on prednisolone 10mg every 2 days. Yesterday she had to have her annual boosters. The vet said it wasn’t worth giving her the injections as the chances are they would not work. This is the first time that we have been told this and she has been on the tablets since she was a few months old. I thought I would rather her have the booster and have that chance of it working. Is this right what the vet has said, or should we still get her vaccinated?

    Many thanks

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    In my opinion, vaccinating a dog like this for DHPP with severe allergic skin disease can cause worsening of allergies in long run, and given immunity to most core viruses lasts for years to life of pet, I would skip nonessential vaccines at this age.

    [Reply]

  71. Vicki
    Posted July 2, 2014 at 2:12 pm | Permalink

    I have a GSD that is 13 and just had back surgery. It’s been 3 months and she is still not walking very good. I started her back on prednisone 10 once a day and she is getting up and walking a little. I’m wondering if I can add MSM to help instead of more prednisone?

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    I dont think MSM alone will be suffice. I would work with a holistic vet on this one. You could consider acupuncture and/or chiropractic . You also could consider working with a veterinary homeopath who uses homeopathy, nutritional therapies and diet. To learn more about homeopathy, see my website http://www.doctordym.com Many homeopathic vets do offer phone consultations if none in your area.

    [Reply]

  72. Angela Jolly
    Posted July 2, 2014 at 8:47 pm | Permalink

    I have a 9 year old terrier mix with chronic bronchitis/ COPD. She frequently gets bacterial infections in her lungs. She is currently on QVAR (1 50mcg puff, three times daily). We alternate every 7 days between Azithromyicin and Amoxicillin to keep her infections at bay. She has also been on between 10 and 20 mg dose of prednisone daily for almost a year and a half. Recently, she has begun to have some bladder control issues (she will urinate while she’s sitting in the floor, almost like she doesn’t even realize she’s going to the bathroom). Is this a long term side effect of prednisone use, should I be worried that she’s developed a kidney or bladder issue from the long term use? Thanks in advance for any words of wisdom.

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Could be side effect of prednisone or perhaps resistant urinary tract infection. SEe vet for recheck, as well as possibly ask about having urine culture done to see if bacteria involved.

    [Reply]

  73. Greta
    Posted July 3, 2014 at 8:37 am | Permalink

    My 12 year old, 72 lb retriever has just been prescribed 20mg of Prednisone daily. The vet thinks she has a cervical disc problem due to her lack of bowel control (intermittent) and difficult in walking (ataxia) . I don’t like to use steroids so am wondering if anti-inflammatory meds would be safer. She is also on phenobarb 64 mg daily due to occasional seizures and 2 joint supplement pills daily. I have also tried Tramadol for her pain, but after a few days of use it didn’t seem to relieve her pain. The vet feels, rather than increase the Tramadol she wants to use the prednisone instead. I am wondering if an anti-inflammatory medications like Tramadol or Rimadyl would be safer than Prednisone. Thanks in advance for your help!

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Sometimes increasing dose of tramadol can help with pain. Probably prednisone is better choice other than non steroidal anti inflammatory, if additional meds needed. I agree with your vet

    [Reply]

  74. Shannon
    Posted July 5, 2014 at 9:18 am | Permalink

    My 1.75 year old 103 lb dog was diagnosed with IBD via endoscopy with biopsy about 4 months ago. He started at 20 mg prednisone per day and was tapered down to 5 mg prednisone every other day. He has been on 5 mg every other day for about 4 weeks and except a few very minor symptoms for a few days after a short stressful trip a week ago (when also he stole 1/2 piece of pizza) he is IBD symptom free and doing great. When I asked about alternative drugs or tapering more, the vet specialist dismissed me, stating that this is a \chronic\ disease and \some animals must be on prednisone for the rest of their lives\. In the beginning she talked about \remission\, which I thought meant we would have some drug free symptom free time periods. Now I feel like she’s dismissing us.

    I understand it is chronic. Maybe this isn’t your field of expertise, but how does she know he needs prednisone forever if we stopped tapering at 5 mg every other day? Was it because of those symptoms after our trip? Also, will this dose cause side effects? He is really still a puppy and I am worried that this drug will destroy his body. So will IBD, I suppose. He is also on FortiFlora, slippery elm and Pepcid 20 mg BID. Anyway, Thanks.

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Not sure how she knows he will need pred forever. I have treated many IBD dogs with homeopathy, nutritional supplements and dietary changes. With that being said, 5 mg pred every other day in dog this size is VERY low dose and shouldn’t’ cause problems. To learn more about homeopathy, go to http://www.doctordym.com Many homeopathic vets offer phone consultations

    [Reply]

    Shannon Reply:

    Thank you for your time Dr. Dym. I’ll check out your website and maybe make an appointment with a holistic vet. Thanks.

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    HI Shannon. I would be happy to help as well as I offer phone consultations to clients from around the country

  75. Jason Kriegler
    Posted July 8, 2014 at 2:41 pm | Permalink

    I have a Rottweiller, 3 years of age. Was healthy and fit up to 2 weeks ago. Started to slow down and sleep, up to last week, I checked him for ticks and he was infested with them, brought him into the Vet and they did bloodwork, he came back positive for Anaplasma, he was given the shot Imidocarb, and put on Doxi and Predni, after 3 days he started to throw up food, he is eating and drinking, my Vet took him off both meds and put him on Ulcer meds, I put him back on the Doxi yesterday and today back on the Predni, so far he’s keeping them both down, but extremely sluggish and sleeping a lot, I’m constantly checking his breathing to see if he’s still here with me. When we did the first blood work his Red Platelets were at 5, where Normal should be between 175-500, I took him the next day and did another blood work and his platelets rose to 55, Tomorrow we go in for another blood test.

    This dog 3 months ago was big and healthy, happy and running and jumping. Now the opposite.

    Am I losing my dog?

    My questions:
    1. Will he get healthy again? Or will he always be slow and sluggish due to the Predni? We will see after tomorrow’s blood test I guess…

    2. What signs will I see if he is getting healthy, seems that the drugs Doxi and Predni are really really effecting him in everyway.

    3. Should I ask my Vet to check for any other “behind the scenes” abnormalties or viruses he may have? If so What?

    Send ANY suggestions or advise for me and my Otto.

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Hard to say. Sounds like there is something else possibly going on here. I would ask your vet for referral to vet internist specialist in your area. Sometimes additional meds are needed to decrease autoimmune reaction such as aziothioprine or atopica, as well as supplements like melatonin to increase platelet numbers. As he responds, you should see his energy going up. Consider having complete thyroid profile as well to see if thyroid is low in this breed.

    [Reply]

    Jason Kriegler Reply:

    Just returned from the vet, we did another blood test and his platelet levels went up, great news. He also wanted me to cut back on the Predi to 25mg every 48hrs due to his panting and heavy breathing, he’s still slow and has no energy, He’s on the Doxi still at 250mg every 12 hours.

    I asked my vet about doing a thyroid check and he advised not necessary at this time. His lungs are clear, temperature is normal, stool is great, eating like a pig, drinking a lot of water from the Predni.

    But how can I get his energy and pep back, I was looking into Echinacea or other natural remidies. I’m sure there’s something else happening, but what????

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Try gemmotherapies Tamarisk and Common Birch and Common Juniper. Learn more about these on my colleague’s website http://www.thepetwhisperer.com I disagree with your vet on thyroid, as my colleague and veterinary hematologist and expert Jean Dodds, DVM has explained how thyroid supplementation helps most dogs with low platelet numbers due to affect on bone marrow, even those without low blood thyroid levels. Hormone melatonin also seems to help the platelet numbers. I would also try antioxidants like proanthozone from 1800petmeds and transfer factor http://www.powerbod.com/2/michaeldym

  76. Monica Hetrick
    Posted July 10, 2014 at 5:32 am | Permalink

    My 16lb rat terrier chihuhua mix has asthma and nasty cough. She we have had her on 5mg of prednisone daily for about a yesr. Whenever we try to taper back to 2.5mg and or every other day the cough comes back within a day or two. She has now been coughing constantly even though we have upped her meds to 5mg or 7.5mg of prednisone daily. We have also had her on theophylin by itself andin.concert with the prednisone and that did nothing. She is a rescue. We think she is about 9. We had to have 16 of her teeth extracted, she had mange whenwe got her about 2 years ago, was underweight. Now she has a bad cataract in her right eye so i think she is most likely blind in it. The prednisone has made her gain weight….she was 10 lbs when we got her and makes her super hyperactive when she isnt sleeping. Not sure what to do with her because i am afraid the prolonged prednisone will shorten her life but we also cant live with the constant coughing. Any insight would be appareciated.

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Make sure your vet has ruled out heart disease. Other options include the great prescription drug for coughs called hydrocodone, which can help many dogs with chronic airway or heart disease coughs. I have also found the natural gemmotherapies helpful known as European Alder and European Hornbeam to be very helpful for tracheal and asthmatic coughs. Learn more about these on my friend and colleague’s website Stephen Blake, DVM at http://www.thepetwhisperer.com

    [Reply]

  77. Megan
    Posted July 14, 2014 at 3:24 pm | Permalink

    Our 2 year old female rottie is on a dose of 25mg prednisone a day. She has been having severe swelling and loss of appetite prior to the predisone decision. She lost almost 20 pounds before starting pred. Since being on pred for the last 6 months she has gained back a bit of weight, but in no regard is her appetite or thirst come back fully. She is also still getting her swelling for about 3 days straight every two weeks. her head, front and back legs, and all joints get about twice the size. Even the knuckles on her toes. poor girl. My question is even though she is on this strong of a dose, things are not fully letting up and she is urinating all over my house all the time with no control and very mopey and not herself is there something else we can be doing for her? They have done every test they say they can do. Multiple lymph node biopsies, tons of blood and urine work. Ultra sounds, X-rays, skin samples allergy tests. We are now at a stand still of just loading her full of these steroids when they are not even helping everything and making her irritable and sad, I have two little children and she is always so amazing with them I would hate to see her not enjoy them anymore. Let alone anything else heaven forbid happening. Is there a different medication that might help? Something I can ask my vet to do further? A specific diet? Supplements? thanks.

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    HI Megan Consider working with a homeopathic or holistic vet like myself on case like this for alternative approaches/nutritional supplements, etc. You could ask your vet about drug called atopica, which is steroid alternative or adjunct in autoimmune disorders. Also learn more about homeopathy at http://www.doctordym.com

    [Reply]

  78. Leena Thattayathu
    Posted July 14, 2014 at 5:36 pm | Permalink

    My Maltese 1.6 years old, 3.2 kilos was diagnosed for White Shakers Syndrome 3 weeks back. She was put on 10mg perdnisone once a day and valium to control the shakes. The vet took her off the valium after a week. After three weeks and a few days she has improved a lot but the shakes are still there. Is it alright to reduce her dosage to 5mg prednisone while she is still shaking or do we wait for the shakes to be gone completely? Our vet told to reduce the dosage when we are comfortable with it and warned us of long term harm. I am worried that her shakes will be back in full force and then we have to go up to 10 mg again. How long is “long term” for her size and dosage? Would antihistamines or cyclosporine be helpful for White Shaker Syndrome? Thanks lots

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Antihistamines now help here. Not sure about cyclosporine as have never used it for this, but might be worth a shot. As for dosage reduction rate, length of therapy, that will vary depending on patient. You should be under close care and watch of your local veterinarian in terms of dose adjustments, etc I would also look at approaching this issue homeopathically. To learn more about homeopathy see the booklet on the website http://www.beyondflatearth.com as well as http://www.drpitcairn.com Many homeopathic vets do offer phone consultations as do I. My website http://www.doctordym.com also has info on this form of treatment.

    [Reply]

  79. Michelle
    Posted July 15, 2014 at 9:40 pm | Permalink

    My parents dog Frosty, a 10 yr old female sheltie was diagnosed with protein losing enteropathy associated with IBD due to food allergies almost a year ago. She did very well on a combination of prednisone, azothiaprine, and a novel protein diet (kangaroo) for 8 months. After that time she declined and her vet and I determined that she developed an allergy to the kangaroo. Her internist recommended changing to a new novel protein and put her back on high doses of Pred. She has been on 20 mg of Pred a day for the last month, as well as her azothiaprine dose every other day. We recently dropped her Pred to 15 mg per day since her albumin levels have been within normal limits. Unfortunately, she has lost almost all her muscle, she’s a skeleton with a big pot belly. And has also developed a nasty skin condition, heavy scaly crusts over very thin skin, in some areas her skin seems in danger of tearing. I read that Pred can cause thinning of the skin so her vet agreed that we should start to decrease the Pred. She is still such a happy sweet girl. She has a voracious appetite (partly due to the Pred I’m sure) and such a will to live. Any suggestions on how I can improve her nutrition without triggering her disease? She is currently on a rabbit diet and I am going to switch her to the Royal Canin Hydrolyzed Protein diet next month. I read that switching the diet every 3 months before the immune system develops an intolerance is beneficial. Any advice would be appreciated. Thanks!

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    HI Michelle. I would consider consulting with a holistic/homeopathic vet on this one, as it sounds like these more processed commercial diets and strong immunosuppressive drugs may not be answer. To learn more about homeopathic vet medicine, go to http://www.beyondflatearth.com and download booklet on homeopathy. Also see information on my website http://www.doctordym.com Many homeopathic vets like myself do offer phone consultations nationwide. I would also start her on transfer factor plus human version. To learn how to order transfer factor plus, go to http://www.powerbod.com/2/michaeldym

    [Reply]

  80. Barbara
    Posted July 19, 2014 at 4:50 pm | Permalink

    My 10 year old flat coated retriever has been diagnosed with “old dog lungs”; his exercise tolerance is greatly reduced and his breathing is labored. He’s been taking Theophylline ER for a month & Deramaxx for about 2 1/2 weeks and has gotten some relief. The vet had me stop the Deramaxx for several days in order to start low dose prednisone: 10 mg 2x day for 7 days, 10 mg once a day for 14 days, and 10 mg every other day for 7 days. I’m nervous about giving prednisone – my last experience was with a dog with cancer. She got 20 mg 2x day for a few weeks, and it was just dreadful: excessive drinking & hunger, muscle weakness, peeing inside the house. So I’m hesitant to try it now. How likely is the lower dose to cause similar problems? Also, should bloodwork be done before starting, since Deramaxx can cause liver & kidney damage?

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Blood work should always be done in geriatric pet this age. As for pred, every dog different with sensitivity. Some are VERY sensitive to even low doses, while others have little side effects at higher doses. Prednisone is usually more effective for COPD lungs than deramaxx, if your vet’s diagnosis is accurate.

    [Reply]

  81. Rhonda Shirley
    Posted July 20, 2014 at 11:50 am | Permalink

    We adopted a 6 year old Dachshund male. He is a beautiful boy and sweet. He has a bad back and high anxiety. He has been on Predispose and Prozac for a while. His anxiety is being left alone and he cries when you come back home.He is house broken but still has accidents when I leave. He is there with my other 2 dogs and has a doggie door to get to the yard. How can I help him to not be so anxious. We have had him only 6 months.

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    You could try the natural supplement L-theonine at dose of 1 to 200 mg twice daily, which may help. Should work with trainer on behavior modification as well to help. I prefer more natural approaches to this including homeopathy. To learn more go to http://www.drpitcairn.com as well as my website http://www.doctordym.com Many homeopathic vets offer phone consultations.

    [Reply]

    Rhonda Reply:

    Should I take Andy off of the Prozac while trying the t L-theonine?

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    I would continue the prescription prozac, while trying the L theonine. If there is improvement, see local vet on possibly tapering down on prozac.

  82. Posted July 21, 2014 at 2:26 am | Permalink

    I have an 11 yr old female English Springer Spaniel who suffers from chronic skin allergies. She has been on Prednisone therapy for over 2 years on and off (tapering always when she goes off). I’m going to start a raw food diet – “Primal” brand has been recommended to see if this is the cause of her allergies. I had an allergen panel done for environmental causes and she’s high for eucalyptus, mold, certain weeds, etc., and except for mold, she is exposed to many of the flora listed in our area, SF Bay Area. The DVM said food allergy testing is pointless since most dogs don’t have food allergies – is this your opinion as well? In the mean time until I start the raw food diet this week I just started her again on another round of Prednisone today and I might have dosed her incorrectly. I have always given her 20 mg (she weighs 46 lbs) per day for 5 days, then tapering by half next 5 days, and half again next 5 days and that continues as maintenance. I GAVE HER 30 MG ON DAY ONE because I read a vet blog that gave the formula as 1 mg per pound of dog. But now I can’t find any other website that agrees, all i can find is 1 mg per kg of dog, which is much less. Luckily I decided to go in the middle and do 30 mg, not 46. Since she was inflamed with skin sores so badly with broken skin and blood seeping. I know our vet has recommended 20 mg to start but when I checked vet website and saw the larger dosing I thought since she was non-stop itching and breaking skin with her teeth for itch relief I should go for the 30 mg. Is this too much for fist 5 days and Should I give her 20 mg now for next 4 days since that’s more the proper dose for her weight? Thank you!

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    HI Yvette Dose of prednisone varies with each patient. Some respond to low doses, while some need higher doses to control itching. Lowest effective tapering dose always best, but need to be under care of good vet. Perhaps ask for referral to vet dermatologist in your area. New drug called apoquel has worked wonders in many patients. Also atopica is also an option. Holistic options include finding a vet trained in NAET in your area to work on allergy desensitization. I think the switch to raw is great. Also consider avoiding vaccinations which can worsen allergies in many pets.

    [Reply]

  83. Michelle mejia
    Posted July 22, 2014 at 11:43 pm | Permalink

    8yr old poodle mix prescribe prednisone 10mg x2 day for 10 days began with a rash on belly area then bleeding out of rectum .. Prescribe anti acid and a liquid for a coating of gi track .. Her platelet level was low aswell help!

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Would need to know more details on case like this, as low platelet counts are sometimes treated with prednisone and other immunosuppressive drugs, if condition is immune mediated, but usually much longer than 10 days. Also ask vet about doing complete thyroid profile as well to see if low thyroid involved.

    [Reply]

    Michelle mejia Reply:

    Minnie is a dog who eats her science diet food aswell as table fed she’s always had itchy skin and sometimes licks her paws .. She became sick very rapidly and unexpected small rash on belly and ears then a few hrs after began the bloody stool there was no feces in her stool just blood she was rushed into the doggy clinic were she recieved an xray which showed a lot of gas and a slightly enlarged liver bloody stool continued for 2 full days it has subsisted but now she was put on prednisone for 10 days to see if her WBC count would increase ?! What could’ve caused the spontaneous bleed ? And will this treatment work ? Could the WBC count be low do to the bleed they were also considering hemorrhaging gastroenteritis. Worried dog parent !
    Thanks for any help or clues to what is going on with my Minnie

    [Reply]

  84. Posted July 25, 2014 at 7:08 pm | Permalink

    Hey, I have a 7 yr old boxer. She was diagnosed with Vestibular disease. She has been on two rounds of antibiotics and prednisone for about 2 months. Whenever we start to wean her off the prednisone, her symptoms start back. ie: stumbling, some circling, unsteady. I’m worried that prolonged use of prednisone will do more harm than good. Is there any other type of steroid/anti-inflammatory medication we could use or anything holistic that might help improve her condition?

    [Reply]

    Dr. Michael Dym, VMD veterinarian Reply:

    Simple vestbular disease does not cause chronic replapsing symptoms like this. There must be another disease here i.e some sort of encephalitis or even a tumor that is causing the symptoms, especially in this breed. I would recommend a consultation with a veterinary neurologist who can offer an MRI or other testing for an accurate diagnosis and long term treatment plan.

    [Reply]

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