Author Archives: Eddie Khoriaty

Eddie Khoriaty

Eddie is the Director of Pharmacy Services and Prescription Department Manager at PetMeds. He is a member of the American Pharmacists Association, the Florida Pharmacy Association and the Broward County Pharmacy Association. Eddie is a Clinical Affiliate Assistant Professor at Nova Southeastern University College of Pharmacy. He received his pharmacy education at St. Johns University, Queens, NY. Eddie is a contributor in the 1800-PetMeds blog. You can also find Eddie on Google+.



How to prevent litter box problems

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Litter box issues are a common problem

One of the most difficult things a cat owner may  have to deal with is a cat having litter box problems. Sadly, more cats are sent to shelters or rejected because of this one problem than anything else. In this blog I will try to give a few bits of advice about this complex topic that usually leads to frustration for the owner and also puts the cat’s life in danger. Read More »

How to determine the correct syringe for your pet’s insulin

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It's important to use the correct syringe for your pet's insulin

A syringe is a syringe, right? Actually, syringes come in different units of measure, different sizes, different needle length, different needle width, different, different, different! Giving insulin to a pet, especially if you’ve never done that before, is stressful enough without having to worry about giving the wrong dose. Unfortunately the body of an animal (or a human) is not so willing to forgive an insulin overdose. Hypoglycemia can and frequently does become life-threatening. Read More »

Treatments for dry eyes in dogs

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Certain breeds are predisposed to getting dry eyes

For many years I have suffered from dry and red eyes. I often get asked if I have been crying or if I was up late. The response is always the same, “I have light, sensitive eyes and I’m particularly vulnerable to getting red eyes, especially during the time of year when the pollen count is high.” Dry eyes occur in pets as well, and it occurs when there isn’t enough lubricant released from the eye glands to keep the eye moist. Natural tears not only contain soothing ingredients they also contain antibodies to help fight against potential infection. Read More »

5 things your dog wants to tell you–before you bring him home

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What your new puppy wants you to know

A dog is a great addition to a family; bringing a dog home is such a rewarding experience, and the joy and love a dog can bring to a family is tremendous. When I walk into my home, I’m greeted by my dogs Duke and Daisy with their tails furiously wagging, and I feel the stress of the whole day leave my body. When I put the leash on them and take them for a walk, I feel totally different than how I felt just moments before when I exited my car and headed into the house. It’s difficult to explain the feeling, but when I see my two dogs enjoying themselves immensely looking at the trees, the blades of grass, and the ducks swimming in the lake, I can’t help but to notice those things myself. The thought of walking into the house with no dogs to greet me saddens me a little, but I also know that some homes and some people should probably not own or raise a dog. A dog in the shelter or the pet store with a wagging tail that screams “take me home” is so difficult to resist that I decided to write this blog about the five important things your dog doesn’t tell you–until you bring him home. Read More »

National Hug Your Cat Day– please approach carefully!

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Cat bites can easily become infected

Today is National Hug Your Cat day. Go ahead and hug your cat, pick your cat up, put the cat on your lap–caressing a cat has actually been known to lower stress markers and maybe even prolong life for both the human and the cat. Now who wouldn’t want a longer, happier life? It seems like a fail-proof method of achieving health and long life, unless the cat doesn’t agree or care about those medical findings and doesn’t wish to be handled. Approaching a cat that wants to be left alone is the fastest way to increase stress for both you and the cat. Cats have extremely sharp nails and sharp, powerful teeth that can cause severe harm. Getting scratched or bitten by a cat is not only painful but it is potentially dangerous. If a cat puts on a display that shows he wants to be left alone, it is best to leave him alone. Read More »

Do pets have the capacity to truly love?

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Many times in an extremely close relationship between two humans there develops a feeling of “oneness.” I have even encountered several people who have developed such a strong feeling of connection that it seems to include the whole of creation. Sometimes the question arises as to whether our pets have the ability to truly love and if they have a soul similar to that of humans. Most people who have felt or heard a cat purring when touched or a dog wagging his tail when near a certain family member would argue that animals do have the ability to love unconditionally. That being said, there are many people in the scientific community who would argue that pets only seem to love others in their “pack” simply as a survival instinct. Read More »

Childproof containers…for pet medications?

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It's important for even pet medication to be in childproof containers

Several times a month we get a request in the pharmacy from one of our customers to “Please place my dog’s heartworm preventative or other medication in non-childproof containers.” The main reason for this request usually stems from the human caretaker having a difficult time opening the container that holds the pet medication. Many times a client may have arthritis or other joint disease and, in at least one case that I’m aware of, the pet owner had lost the use of one of his hands in an overseas operation. Generally the pharmacist taking the call will have no problem honoring that request.

There are other times however when the caller begins the conversation with a general question about our safety enclosure policy: “Why do you put this medication in a bottle with safety caps? I can assure you that my dog is not going to get into the bottle and the days of us having young children around the house are long behind us.” This week I decided to address this topic so that I can hopefully shed a little light on the subject so that people can better understand the reason behind the use of safety enclosures. Read More »

What you should know about corticosteroids and your pet

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Corticosteroids can cause a number of side-effects in your pet

My Lab mix Duke is 11 years old and he has Addison’s disease, which is a condition that requires him to be regularly medicated with corticosteroids such as prednisone, dexamethasone, or Percorten. When he was diagnosed about a year ago we thought we were going to lose him, but as soon as he started on this regimen of steroids he seemed to immediately get better: his energy increased, his coat was shinier, and I thought to myself that he has never looked or acted better even when he was younger. As a pharmacist I know that corticosteroids used long-term could potentially have some very troubling side effects and since it’s been a year since Duke started his first dose of prednisone, I decided to write this blog to describe how he’s doing on the medication. Read More »

Urinating outside the litter box? What your cat could be trying to tell you

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It's important that your cat always has access to fresh water

Sophia is not only very spiritual but she is also extremely creative; she’s involved in the local poetry organization and has become quite a star in the South Florida poetry reading events. As an employee who usually volunteers to work late each day when asked, I was surprised when she suddenly began running out the door at the end of her shift without even saying goodbye. Sophia also seemed a bit distracted and not behaving like the lively and happy employee that I had come to know over the past several years. Out of concern, I decided to ask her if there was anything wrong or if there was anything I could do to help her. As she began speaking her eyes filled up with tears and she became visibly upset.

I have come to realize after years of being around musicians and artists that creative people tend to be extremely sensitive and emotional. Through her tears she was able to describe the situation at her home involving her cat who had turned the family’s beautiful rug into her large personal litter box. Each day Sophia had to run home and clean up after the cat before other members of her family came home and smelled or stepped in the urine. Her biggest fear was that she would be forced to give up her cat. After suggesting to her that it is possible that this condition may actually have a cure, Sophia called her veterinarian. The doctor did diagnose the cat with a urinary tract infection and prescribed a week-long course of antibiotics. Apparently the infection was causing all these problems and after a week, what seemed like vindictive peeing was totally cleared up after the infection was cured. Read More »

Itchy dog? Understanding atopy in pets

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Atopy affects as many as 10% of all dogs

Last week I ran into my friend Jenny who reminded me of my first job as a pharmacy intern at a pharmacy in Bayside, New York. Jenny was the head pharmacist there and she was a beautiful young woman who seemed to have everything a recent graduate could want: intelligence, friends, family, a wonderful profession, and a great job. Every day when I came in for my shift, Jenny would greet me with a great big smile and a loud “good morning Mr. Eddie!” Her entire demeanor was saying “I am happy and wish to spread some of this happiness to you.”

One day as I was putting stock up on the shelves I noticed that Jenny began to seem uncomfortable and had lost her characteristic good cheer. No one could understand what had caused such a change in Jenny’s demeanor. A week later Jenny explained to the whole staff that she had something called Atopy or “atopic syndrome” and her whole body was full of an itchy rash which required her to be on medication. It was apparent that these medications had caused a change in her personality. Since Atopy also occurs in pets I thought it would be a good week to discuss this condition as well as some of its treatments. Read More »