Ease aggressive behavior and have a blast with your pooch!

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Filed under 1800petmeds, New Pet Products at PetMeds

Active dogs are less likely to get into trouble

Sometimes when your dog is pent up in the house for too long, or hasn’t had the appropriate amount of exercise, he or she can start to develop some aggressive behavior. Unfortunately, this aggression can rear its ugly head and cause destructive behavior such as chewing, barking or destroying your furniture. Read More »

Keep your indoor cat entertained with the Kong Kickeroo

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Filed under New Pet Products at PetMeds

Toys can keep your cat occupied and out of trouble

It’s natural for cats to wrestle, stalk and pounce on prey. However, for indoor cats, stalking prey outdoors doesn’t come easily, and objects in your home may become the “victim.” Also, some cats become aggressive if he or she isn’t allowed to indulge in these instinctual needs.

Luckily, toys are a great way to keep an indoor cat occupied and out of trouble, but finding the right toy for your cat can be a challenge. Cats are very independent and can lose interest easily. That’s why it’s important to find a toy that keeps your cat entertained and helps reduce aggressive behavior. Read More »

Keep Your Dog Active, Even at Night

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Filed under New Pet Products at PetMeds

A fun way to keep your dog active, even at night

We all know how important it is to spend time with our pets, but sometimes there is just not enough time in the day. Getting home late after work doesn’t allow much playtime with pets, which can lead to an un-exercised pet. Pets that don’t get enough exercise through the day can become overweight, or bored, which can result in bad behavior. But exercise can be hard to give your dog when it’s dark outside. Read More »

Can Your Pet Recognize Your Voice?

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Filed under Healthy Pets and Owners

Animals can identify the voices of their fellow animals

When we’re in dog training classes, the instructor invariably says, “Stop saying your dog’s name before each command. He knows it’s your voice giving the command, so he just needs to hear the command. He already knows it’s you and you’re speaking to him.” I have to say, my dogs are terrific about sitting promptly to my commands, while they ignore the same command given by the owner next to me in class when she’s talking to her dog. Read More »

Coprophagia – Dealing With a Disgusting Habit

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Filed under Pharmacy Blog

The consumption feces of an animal from another species of animal is called intercoprophagia

I have heard of dogs consuming their own feces for a variety of reasons; however, when I noticed my dog “Duke” eating feces from the cat’s litter box, I felt that he had taken disgusting to a whole new level. For the remainder of the day I kept wondering what caused this and how to prevent it from happening again. I certainly didn’t ever want to see him doing this again. You’d think that my cats, being very clean by nature would appreciate the help with the cleanup but even they did not. The further Duke is away from them and their litter box, the happier they generally are for some reason. Read More »

Should Your Dog Be Allowed On The Furniture?

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Filed under 1800petmeds, New Pet Products at PetMeds

If you let your dog on the sofa, protect it with a pet sofa throw

Some families have a casual attitude about allowing the four-legged family member join them on the furniture, while other households have concerns about this practice. It can be hard to refuse that furry face and the big eyes silently pleading to join you, and most dogs want nothing more than to be curled up beside you at all times. Allowing your dog to join you on the sofa allows you to share companionship and snuggle time, but there are drawbacks to consider. Read More »

Treat Your Friend Like a Rat

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Filed under Healthy Pets and Owners

Rats can show empathy and compassion

A fascinating experiment conducted at the University of Chicago and reported in the journal Science may make you rethink using the phrase “he’s a rat” to mean something derogatory. In this study, two rats who were not familiar with each other were placed in an experiment. One rat was confined in a small enclosure that he couldn’t escape. The other rat was outside of the enclosure where it could move freely and had access to a stash of chocolate chips. The enclosure was rigged in such a way that the free rat could work to let the other rat escape. Read More »

Over-Grooming In Cats

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Filed under Dr. Dym's Vet Blog

Over-grooming, or "barbering" is a frustrating skin problem seen in many feline companions

A frustrating skin problem seen in many feline companions is when they over-groom and/or pull their hair out. This may occur on any part of the body, but most commonly occurs on the belly and flank regions. Many times there will be no other primary skin lesions or eruptions, but just the presence of the barbered and shortened hair. Any cat presenting with this condition should have a full skin workup, including possibly skin scrape for mites, evaluation of hairs for external skin parasites including fleas and lice, as well as a thorough dermatologic history to assess for possibly underlying inhalant/contact allergies and/or food allergies.

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Obsessions – Making it Difficult for our Pets to “Obey”

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Filed under Pharmacy Blog

Behavioral correction in canines has to come the instant that the behavior occurs

“Behave while we’re out” I used to hear my grandmother tell her little miniature poodle, Mimi, on our way out the door. She usually had a day full of activities planned for me when I would go to visit her. We would sometimes go to the park, to an amusement park, the zoo, or to a movie. When we got back to her home, grandmother would start walking around her house taking an inventory of what Mimi had destroyed while we were gone. When something was discovered, she would quickly bring Mimi to the “crime scene” and, while swinging a newspaper, she would keep saying “You’re such a bad girl Mimi, I’m going to teach you to obey me if it’s the last thing that I do.”

An unwelcome thought enters the mind, and any attempt to ignore it only results in magnifying it even more. It is recognized as irrational, time-consuming, and draining. Obsessive behavior is very difficult and frustrating for humans to deal with, and in dogs it can be even more so. Dogs do not necessarily understand the nature of the obsessions and have no basis of comparison between a healthy thought and an unhealthy one. Many owners do not understand why their pet is continuously tearing shoes apart, excessively barking, destroying furniture, and constantly licking. Some pets have mild obsessive behavior, and others have a severe condition.

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How a Pet Grieves: Understanding Your Dog or Cat’s Loss

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Filed under 1800petmeds

If your pet is grieving, there are actions you can take to help him recover and move on.

When contemplating the responsibilities of being a pet owner, most people usually think about the routine, day-to-day activities, such as feeding, bathing, exercising, and loving your dog or cat. Though these things are important, there are times when pets have additional needs, one of which is emotional care when your pet is experiencing grief. When a family member or another pet dies or leaves the household, it is important for a pet guardian to understand how their other pet[s] may be grieving, what signs to look for, and how to best support their grieving pet emotionally. There are actions you can take to help your pet recover and move on.

When a pet’s owner dies or leaves the home, especially if the pet and owner were together for many years, the pet may experience confusion at his or her owner’s absence, which can lead to depression or grief once time passes and the owner has not returned. Because animals can form strong bonds with other pets in the household, they may also experience grief over the loss of another pet. Certainly, your pet’s experience of grief is different than what a human may experience. Our dogs and cats don’t cry, and because they live in the moment, don’t experience feelings of guilt or regret for “unfinished business” they may have had with the person who is no longer in their lives. Pets are sensitive to our moods and often will respond to the sadness and changes in behavior of the remaining people in the household. If you are sad and anxious, your pet will pick this up and mirror your feelings.

Signs that your pet may be grieving include sudden destructive chewing or clawing, whimpering, lack of appetite, constant pacing as if he is searching for his lost companion or owner, and emotional outbursts, such as snapping or growling at people. Your pet may also have changes in sleep patterns. You may notice that your pet craves more attention and reassurance from you, or loses interest in what were previously favorite activities.

Some things you can do to help ease your pet’s grief include spending extra time with your pet, frequently petting and talking to him reassuringly, providing him with comfort items, such as favorite toys and blankets. For pets that have lost their owner, consider providing items that carry the scent of their owner such as an item of clothing or a pillowcase. It is important to try to keep your pet’s routine as much the same as possible, as the disruption in his regular routine may cause more distress. If an “alpha” pet has left the household or died, allow your remaining pets to establish their new pecking order, but step in if fights escalate.

The sudden loss of another pet or person that was previously an important part of your dog or cat’s life can be disorienting and upsetting to your pet. Once you realize that your pet is grieving, you will be able to help your dog or cat during its grieving process with some extra TLC. If you have lost a pet, allow your remaining pets to re-establish a normal routine before you adopt another pet.

Has your pet shown signs of grief? How did you help your own pet cope?